Month: August 2019

Ethiopian Cultural Garden dedication in Cleveland

In the 103-year history of the Cleveland Cultural Gardens, there had never been a garden representing an African nation.

That changes Saturday when the Ethiopian Cultural Garden is officially dedicated in a ceremony starting at 1 p.m. One of the garden’s defining features is a five-paneled ceramic mural with each panel representing a period of Ethiopian history.

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Kenyan-born professor among new Americans as New York State Fair holds naturalization ceremony

Kenyan-born Dr. Godriver Odhiambo, a professor, at Le Moyne was among immigrants sworn in as American at the grounds of the New York Fair.

To honor New Americans day, nearly 100 immigrants were sworn in on Friday during a naturalization ceremony at Daniella’s, formerly the Empire Room. This is the fifth year the State Fair has held the ceremony and each one carries a lasting impact.

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East Africans Clock in With Hope, Hard Work on Minnesota’s Thankless Jobs

By SOLOMON GUSTAVO

Calling Aklilu Burayu a parking ramp attendant doesn’t come close to describing the roles he’s played in the Twin Cities economy.

In the 13 years since coming to Minnesota from Ethiopia, he’s been a painter and sander at a Blaine wood factory, an assembly line worker in Arden Hills and worked a succession of office jobs through a staffing agency. These days when he’s not at the ramp, he picks up shifts at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport as a chef.  

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NAACP Group Arrives In Ghana Exactly 400 Years Since First Slaves Were Brought To U.S.

Drummers, dancers and local residents welcomed the NAACP delegation at Kotoka International Airport, as the group made their long-awaited arrival in Ghana for the Year of Return.

The excitement was palpable as almost 300 African Americans touched down in Accra for an eventful week that is akin to a homecoming.

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Diplomats, Business Executives expected at USAfrica Business Expo During the 74th General Assembly in New York

On September 20, the eve of the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Her Excellency Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao – African Union Ambassador to the U.S.A., will lead other diplomats, and business leaders to the USAfrica Business Expo — a B2B trade show, conference & networking event aimed at helping African businesses expand into international markets.

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Separate festivals honor African, African American heritage, culture

Separate festivals honor African, African American heritage, culture

By Eric Lagatta



Columbus has long been home to African Americans who have contributed to the city’s rich tapestry. For decades, the neighborhood now known as the King-Lincoln District has buzzed with African American business owners, musicians and artists. And throughout the city, African immigrants are bringing their own cultures to Ohio’s capital.

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Inspired by Fela, Nigeria’s Burna Boy blazes trail in the US

By GARY GERARD HAMILTON, ASSOCIATED PRESS NEW YORK 

Burna Boy was only six years old when Afrobeat pioneer Fela Kuti passed away, but that was enough time for the future musician to be inspired.

“Everyone’s got their hero,” the 28-year-old Nigerian performer said. “For me, that’s my hero.”

Kuti — the Nigerian musical icon and political agitator whose life and legacy was portrayed in the wildly popular Broadway musical “Fela!” — was once managed by Burna Boy’s grandfather, someone else he calls a hero.

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The Fabric of Nigerian Weddings

By Adenike Olanrewaju

The color and flair of traditional ceremonies give brides and grooms a way to express a vibrant cultural heritage.


Dola Fatunbi Olutoye, 25, was ecstatic after becoming engaged last November to Dr. Yinka Olutoye, 26. She knew she wanted a traditional Nigerian wedding, but needed help executing the cultural elements of the ceremony, which took place on May 25 in Houston.

Mrs. Olutoye, a pharmacy student from Houston, and Dr. Olutoye, a recent medical school graduate, are both Nigerian-Americans who are part of the Yoruba ethnic group, which is heavily concentrated in the Southwest region of Nigeria.

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With African Music On The Rise, Afro-Themed Dance Parties Get To Win, Too

by Amira Rasool

When walking up to the venue for New York City day party Everyday Afrique, the music greets you before you can even reach the door. Depending on the day or the DJ, you might be welcomed with a remix of Afrobeats star Mr. Eazi’s 2013 hit song “Bankulize” or embraced by Niniola’s 2017 Afrohouse single “Maradona.”

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Slavery’s 400-Year Anniversary Brings Tourist Boom To Ghana

By Alessandra Prentice and Siphiwe Sibeko, Reuters

In a clearing at the turnoff to Assin Manso, a billboard depicts two African slaves in loincloths, their arms and legs in chains. Beside them are the words, “Never Again!” This is “slave river,” where captured Ghanaians submitted to a final bath before being shipped across the Atlantic into slavery centuries ago, never to return to the land of their birth. Today, it is a place of somber homecoming for the descendants of those who spent their lives as someone else’s property.

The popularity of the site has swelled this year, 400 years after the trade in Africans to the English colonies of America began. This month’s anniversary of the first Africans to arrive in Virginia has caused a rush of interest in ancestral tourism, with people from the United States, the Caribbean and Europe seeking out their roots in West Africa.

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Ndlovu Youth Choir once again outshines others in America’s Got Talent Read

South Africa’s Ndlovu Youth Choir has once again wowed audiences – this time with their gorgeous rendition of U2’s Beautiful Day in the America’s Got Talent’s quarter-finals. The choir is a huge hit with both American and Mzansi fans and they’ve come a lot further than people thought a choir would go in the competition.

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Remittances From Abroad To Nigeria Can Grow To $34.8 Billion In 2023 -PwC Report

Migrant remittances were 77.2% of the Nigerian federal government’s budget in 2018, represented 6.1% of GDP and were more than 10 times the foreign direct investment (FDI) flows into the country in the same period, according to PwC’s latest White Paper Series, Strength from Abroad: The Economic Power of Nigeria’s diaspora.

PwC estimates that migrant remittances to Nigeria could grow to $25.5 billion, $29.8 billion and $34.8 billion in 2019, 2021 and 2023 respectively.

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Canada is ‘stealing’ the brightest and smartest young people from Nigeria

By Ms Imosemi

Yes, Canada is not just taking our young people, they are taking the fattest of our crops, the best, the brightest, and the brainiest!

One of them is my friend, Olufemi, (not real name). He graduated top of his class and best in the entire university! Nine years after graduation, he got married to his equally cerebral lawyer wife, and they both had fairly paying jobs that admitted them into the struggling middle class in Nigeria. A year after marriage, Olufemi,  disillusioned by the state of his family’s finances, the  situation in the country and the underutilisation of his skills, and intellect at his place of work, sold all his assets and relocated his young family to Canada!

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Only 79 Nigerians have enrolled for National Identity Number in the US

The National Identity Management Commission (NIMC) of Nigeria says only 79 Nigerians had been enrolled for the National Identity Number (NIN) in the United States.

The update came through the Deputy General Manager of NIMC, Ms Uche Chigbo, almost three months after the exercise was launched in the U.S. in late May.

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Nigerians Prefer New York for their Passports issues says Consul General

The Consul General of Nigeria in New York, Mr Benaoyagha Okoyen, says the consulate is operating above capacity especially in passport service delivery.

Okoyen said that although the situation was an indication of growing public confidence in the office, it had been a major challenge.

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