Month: July 2019

Nigerian Efe Ajagba out-punches Demirezen

Remains undefeated after 11 fights, although this was a much harder test.

By Keith Idec

Ali Eren Demirezen demonstrated Saturday night that Efe Ajagba remains very much a work in progress. The previously unbeaten Turkish heavyweight gave Ajagba the toughest fight of the Nigerian knockout artist’s two-year pro career. Ajagba went the distance for the first time in 11 professional fights and had difficulty dealing with Demirezen’s pressure at times in a fight that seemed more competitive than two of the three scorecards suggested.

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Ghanaian media man, Charles Nimmo Ntiamoah-Mensah, honoured in New York

The New Glory Fellowship International honoured Ghana’s own and the U.S. based Mr Charles Nimmo Ntiamoah-Mensah (Mr CNN). The Humanitarian God’s Glory Award was given to the Founder/CEO of 3G Media Inc. in recognition of his years of personal dedication to promote the best of Ghanaian achievements at home and abroad in art, music, sports, community, and business.

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A Guide to All the African Artists Who Appear on Beyoncé’s Lion King Album

By Gabrielle Bruney

The “live-action” Lion King remake hews closely to the original film, even recreating some scenes with shot-for-shot precision. But Beyoncé’s album that accompanies the film, The Lion King: The Gift, takes an approach that’s more inspired than a simple retread of familiar songs. Though the 27-track release is liberally woven with at-times distracting spoken word excepts from the film, the songs themselves are only inspired by the story, and you don’t need to be a Lion King fan to get on board. 

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Lion King movie premiere raises Kenya’s tourism profile

The premiere of the new Lion King movie has elevated Kenya’s profile as one of the leading  tourist destinations in Africa.

ICT Cabinet Secretary Joe Mucheru and Kenya Tourism Board (KTB) officials were among the first Kenyans to watch the movie at Century Imax inside Garden City Mall in Nairobi.

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Immigration And The African Diaspora

Dr. Halifu Osumare

With the Trump administration’s hardline and heartless immigration policies — starting with the 2017 rescinding of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) for young immigrants already in the U.S. and continuing with the 2018 family separation policy under his so-called “zero-tolerance” approach at the U.S.-Mexico border — the focus has been on brown people escaping poverty, gang violence, and state terror in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador. But there are also tens of thousands of African, Caribbean, and African diasporans entering the country by plane that are also trapped in the morass of Trumpian hardline immigration policies.

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Brooklyn Naija: Family and Life

Nigerian families in Brooklyn weave much of their native culture into their everyday lives

By Victoria Ifatusin


Nigerian immigrants to Brooklyn say they were seeking better economic opportunities and a shot at the American Dream when they decided to move to the United States. However, for those who are raising families, preserving their cultural norms is an important part of that assimilation.

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Canadian Prime minister wishes Nigerians in Regina happy Igbo Day, August 3

As the  Igbo community of Saskatchewan prepares to celebrate its Nigerian-Canadian heritage on August 3, Canada’s Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, Honourable Ralph Goodale, has sent greetings to the Igbo Cultural Association of Saskatchewan (ICAS).

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American journalists have duty to report on tragedies in Africa.

By Isha Sesay

There are few impenetrable corners left in the world. Today, thanks to globalization, innovations in technology, and the rise of social media, the world feels small, and those living in distant places are increasingly relatable. Unless, of course, we are talking about Africa.

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American varsities award 303 Nigerian students $7.5m scholarships

More than 303 Nigerian students from the 17 states of southern Nigeria have received no less than $7.5m in full or partial scholarships from 225 American universities and colleges to study in the United States for the 2019-2020 academic session.

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How Burna Boy Became Nigeria’s Surprise Success Story

by Nick Duerden

When Burna Boy arrives three hours late to an east London studio on a balmy July evening, he is laid-back to the point of comatose — and monosyllabic. He asks that the photo shoot happen quickly, and when he sits down to be interviewed, the first thing he does is stand up again. “No,” he says, suddenly definitive. “Need a smoke. Come.”

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How to Fix America’s Absentee Diplomacy in Africa

By Howard W. French

Earlier this month, The New York Times created a mini furor on the internet with a job listing for someone to lead its coverage of East Africa. The announcement described it as an opportunity “to dive into news and enterprise across a wide range of countries, from the deserts of Sudan and the pirate seas of the Horn of Africa, down through the forests of Congo and shores of Tanzania.” It went on to speak of the region’s “many vital story lines, including terrorism, the scramble for resources, the global contest with China,” among others.

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‘I do everything all Americans do.’ Home but for how long? ICE releases Mauritanian man after 11 months

Amadou Sow, 49, a Mauritanian national, stands in the doorway of his apartment in Lockland, where his family has lived for 13 years. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested him Aug. 22 but inexplicably released him July 12 after almost 11 months in detention. (Photo: Albert Cesare / The Enquirer)

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‘My life has no meaning.’ Man whose family was killed in 737 Max crash slams Boeing

Kenyan man whose family was killed in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max in Ethiopia in March slammed the manufacturer and told lawmakers at a congressional hearing Wednesday to scrutinize the Federal Aviation Administration, which approved the now-grounded planes two years ago.

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Collins Oghor: “African solutions to African problems”

McGill MBA alumnus, doctor, international medical researcher, global health consultant, company owner, fitness buff, world traveler, fashion maven. And 27 years old. There’s no pigeon-holing Collins Oghor.

The McGill grad who arrived in Canada from Nigeria at 17 to attend McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont., and then McGill, has come full circle. He will soon return to Nigeria, from where he will fan out across the African continent as a consultant on global health initiatives.

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US honours Nigerian imam who hid Christians from killers

A Nigerian imam, who saved 262 Christians from killer herdsman by hiding them in his mosque and home, has been honoured by the US government.

Imam Abubakar Abdullahi, 83, received the International Religious Freedom Award alongside four others from Cyprus, Sudan, Brazil and Iraq.

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