Month: October 2019

MARKS NAMED US AMBASSADOR TO SOUTH AFRICA

By Patrick Burgess

Controversial former Bermuda resident Lana Marks has been confirmed as the American ambassador to South Africa by the US Senate almost a year after President Donald Trump appointed her to the post.

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ADEBAYO OGUNLESI: The Nigerian-American Lawyer And Global Investment Banker

Adebayo O Ogunlesi, born December 20, 1953, is a Nigerian lawyer and investment banker. Ogunlesi is currently Chairman and Managing Partner at the private equity firm Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP). Ogunlesi was the former head of Global Investment Banking at Credit Suisse First Boston before being promoted to Chief Client Officer and Executive Vice Chairman. Ogunlesi is from Makun, Sagamu, Ogun State in Nigeria.

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Calgary’s Nigerian community in shock over slaying of social worker

By ALANNA SMITH

Members of Calgary’s Nigerian community are in shock after a woman dedicated to helping the less fortunate was killed at a local care facility.

Deborah Onwu, a Nigerian immigrant who was a youth social worker employed by Wood’s Homes, was fatally stabbed Friday, allegedly at the hands of an 18-year-old she was caring for at an assisted living facility in the city’s southwest.

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Little Mogadishu on the Mississippi

Minnesota’s Somali Americans strive to free their community from violence

by Onize Ohikere 

The Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in downtown Minneapolis is nicknamed “Little Mogadishu” because of its Somali American population. On Somali Street, a mall rests inside a wide, blue bungalow. There, different vendors in stalls sell traditional clothes, food items, and duvets. 

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African Catholics converge for regional conference in Newark

By Juliet Njoku 

African Catholics from the Diocese of Camden and the Archdioceses of Philadelphia and Newark converged at the Blessed Sacrament Saint Charles Borromeo Parish, Newark, on Oct. 11-12, 2019. It was the first regional conference of the National Association of African Catholics in the United States (NAACUS) hosted by NAACUS Region 3, comprised of dioceses in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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Brian Shimkovitz on his quest to find awesome African albums

By Bolaji Alonge

American music collector Brian Shimkovitz has a keen ear for music that could be easily lost in the bargain bin of history. Before realising his Awesome Tapes From Africa (ATFA) music blog and DJ project, Shimkovitz had gone to Ghana to study the hip hop scene in the country. He returned to the US with a host of audio cassettes that one could only find at African markets.

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Student who starred on Nigerian TV follows his passions at RIT

Dewé lives a double life with his interests of music and engineering

by Greg Livadas


Adesola Adedewe may be thousands of miles from his native Nigeria while attending Rochester Institute of Technology, but that doesn’t stop him from being recognized by other international students who watched him as a contestant on The Voice: Nigeria, which aired throughout the African continent in 2016.

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The Genre-Defying Singer with Ethiopian heritage is inspired by Japanese Funk

Berhana, the Atlanta musician behind 2016’s “Janet,” talks about incorporating diverse geographic influences in his debut album, HAN.

By HANNAH GIORGIS


When Berhana, the 27-year-old singer born Amain Berhane, finished his film program at the New School, he did what a lot of young artistic people in New York City do: He started working at a restaurant. During his time as a chef and assistant manager at Robataya, a now-defunct Japanese spot in the East Village, the recent graduate undertook a new, informal curriculum in Japanese culture; he was even tasked with learning to speak the language.

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As economic growth languishes, state of Maine banks on immigrants

In northern New England, an aging population has hamstrung growth, but immigration could provide heft for the workforce.

By Alfonso Serrano


Born in Somalia, Abdullahi Ali grew up in a refugee camp in Kenya before arriving in Maine in the United States on a brisk day 10 years ago this month.

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CROSS COUNTRY: LOMONG BROTHERS RUN TO BETTER LIFE IN U.S.

By Marcus Horton

At the Big Ten Cross Country Championships in 2018, then-junior Ohio State cross country runner Alex Lomong ran the third-fastest outdoor 800-meter time in program history.

Nearly three decades earlier, his brother Lopez Lomong ran for his life, escaping entrapment as a child soldier in South Sudan during the Second Sudanese Civil War.

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