Tag: Africans in America

Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the U.S. Are Often More Educated Than Those in Top European Destinations

Sub-Saharan immigrants in the United States are also more highly educated than U.S. native-born population

BY MONICA ANDERSON AND PHILLIP CONNOR | PEW RESEARCH CENTER

As the annual number of migrants from sub-Saharan Africa to both the United States and Europe has grown for most years this decade, a Pew Research Center analysis of U.S. Census Bureau and Eurostat data finds that sub-Saharan immigrants in the U.S. tend to be more highly educated than those living in the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Portugal – Europe’s historically leading destinations among sub-Saharan immigrants.

Read from source The African Immigrant

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The truth about Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the United States

By Carlos Echeverria-Estrada and Jeanne Batalova|Migration Policy Institute

There were very few sub-Saharan Africans in the United States just a few decades ago, with under 150,000 residents in 1980. Since then, immigrants from some of the largest sub-Saharan countries, such as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Ghana, Somalia, and South Africa, have settled in the United States. Overall, more than 2 million immigrants have come from the 51 countries that comprise sub-Saharan Africa, making up 84 percent of the 2.4 million immigrants from the entire African continent. The remainder are from the six countries of North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia.

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The African Diaspora Network Gives Africans Living Abroad A Pathway To Invest At Home

By Meghan McCormick |Forbes

Global remittances to Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) grew by 10% to $46B in 2018 (the last year for which we have complete data from the World Bank). Remittances, or money sent as a gift typically from family members working in a high-income country to family members living in low- or middle-income countries, are an important part of the global economy. They account for more transfer of funds to SSA than aid from the top 10 donor countries and institutions. The money sent to Africa through remittances is actually larger than many African-country GDPs. Remittances would be the 12th most productive economy in SSA, just behind the Democratic Republic of the Congo and ahead of Côte d’Ivoire.

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Ghanaian entrepreneur and Nigerian win MBA scholarship from Boston University

The Questroom School of Business at the prestigious Boston University, USA, has announced the winners of its Master of Business Administration (MBA) scholarship application for 2020-2021 academic year. The 100% tuition scholarship opportunity which is sponsored by Boston University was open to all Ghanaian and Nigerian citizens. Two outstanding applicants were awarded; Miss Helena Jennifer Afordoanyi from Ghana and Mr Olusegun Awobajo from Nigeria.

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African Student Union celebrates heritage, mental health awareness at University of Georgia

By Mikaela Cohen

To embrace African heritage and ignite a mental health discussion, the University of Georgia’s African Student Union showcased a series of traditional African dances weaved through a story of a modern African family facing mental health issues during the “African Night”

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Trump Allies in Americas Block Africans’ Path to US Asylum

By The Associated Press

President Donald Trump isn’t the only world leader making it virtually impossible for many Africans to get asylum in the United States. He’s getting plenty of help from allies in the Americas. Ecuador is closing its doors as one of the few countries in North and South America to welcome African visitors, depriving them of a starting point for their dangerous journeys north by land.

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Top 10 influential migrant Africans in the United States

 In celebration of Black History Month, WorldRemit, a leading fintech company and provider of international money transfer services, has launched the inaugural Top Ten Most Influential Africans in the Diaspora list. WorldRemit launched this list to honor and recognize the contributions Africans have made in America.

By Claudine Moore

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Mandela Washington Fellowship returns to University of Georgia in summer 2020

The University of Georgia is proud to announce its selection as an Institute Partner for the 2020 Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. Beginning in mid-June, UGA will host 25 of Africa’s bright, emerging Civic Engagement leaders for a six-week Leadership Institute, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

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The diary of an African immigrant

By Kiki Aderoju

Plenty of African immigrant children or first-generation Americans know the internal struggle that comes with finding a comfortable middle ground of where they fit in. These are usually children who didn’t fit in with the white kids but would find themselves not fitting in with the black kids either. They felt like Africans in America more so than they felt like African Americans. Many times, their culture, their traditions manifested in completely different ways than for African Americans.

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Africans in the Bronx Find Family on the Soccer Field

One day nine years ago, Abrourazakou Bawa, a truck driver originally from Togo, was in his home borough of the Bronx when he noticed a disappointed kid walking with a soccer ball under his arm.

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AFRICAN STUDENT UNION PANEL TAKES ON QUESTION: HOW BLACK IS BLACK ENOUGH?

By Sandra Whitehead 

At an urban university with a growing minority student population, the African Student Union provides opportunities for unity. ASA hosted a panel called “How Black is Black Enough?” at the UWM Union’s Wisconsin Lounge on Wednesday night.

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African culture celebrated at Heritage Fest Miami

The Black History Month event was held S at the Arsht Center.

Sheron Williams, sales director of Concerned African Women Inc., shed some historic light on African head-wrapping to show Black women have been “fly” for centuries.

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Educational Institutions Across United States to Host Mandela Washington Fellows

Launched in 2014, the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders is the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI) and embodies the United States’ commitment to invest in the future of Africa.  YALI was created in 2010 and is celebrating its 10th anniversary supporting young Africans as they spur economic growth and prosperity, strengthen democratic governance, and enhance peace and security across Africa.  Since 2014, nearly 4,400 young leaders from every country in Sub-Saharan Africa have participated in the Mandela Washington Fellowship.

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It’s now faster for immigrants to help their relatives become U.S. residents. Here’s how

Immigrants who obtain legal permanent resident status in the United States and those who, later, become naturalized U.S. citizens, often long for their close relatives — both abroad and inside the country — to follow their successful immigration journey.

There are several ways to help an eligible family member to immigrate to the U.S., but almost always this complex process begins with the submission of an essential form to establish the relationship between the applicant and the beneficiary.

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The other African-Americans

The African-born migrant population is doubling every decade.


“I just came to hustle,” explains Gabriel, a recent migrant, as he wields an electric razor to sculpt an impressive structure from a teenage customer’s hair. During shifts at Afrikiko Hair & Fashion Boutique, in northern Chicago, he gets the chance to display a range of skills. Not least, his gift for languages: he speaks four, all from Ghana, besides English. Mostly he chatters in Twi, the most popular tongue in the west-African country.

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