Tag: Africans in America

Why everyone from Cardi B to Kanye West is speaking out against police brutality in Nigeria

By Kara Weisenstein | MIC

Protests against police brutality in Nigeria have gotten a big visibility boost from some famous faces in recent days, including Burna Boy, WizKid, John Boyega, Chance the Rapper, and Cardi B. They’re throwing their weight behind a movement that spilled from social media into the streets last week, as young Nigerians demand sweeping reform to corrupt law enforcement practices. While the government seemed to acquiesce over the weekend, protesters weren’t satisfied, and promised to keep applying pressure until real change was achieved.

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As U.S. struggles, Africa’s covid-19 response is praised.

by CARA ANNA | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

At a lecture to peers this month, John Nkengasong showed images that once dogged Africa, with a magazine cover declaring it “The Hopeless Continent.” Then he quoted Ghana’s first president, Kwame Nkrumah: “It is clear that we must find an African solution to our problems, and that this can only be found in African unity.”

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Why Black students should experience black life outside of the U.S.

By Devin Walker | Statesman

When I reflect on the Black Lives Matter movement and the many viral images that have galvanized protesters into action, my mind keeps going back to a disquieting video that did not result in belligerent shouting or bloodshed.

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7 African artists share their feelings on the glory — and missteps — of Beyoncé’s Black is King

By Amanda Parris  |  CBC

Of all the life-altering and terrifying changes that have occurred in 2020, one of the more fascinating shifts has been happening in celebrity culture. Stars have always been placed on a pedestal, and now that pedestal’s being shaken. 

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USCIS announces massive increases in U.S. immigration fees

BY DANIEL SHOER ROTH | Miami Herald

The Trump administration announced on Friday an exorbitant increase in fees for some of the most common immigration procedures, including an 81% increase in the cost of U.S. citizenship for naturalization. It will also now charge asylum-seekers, which is an unprecedented move.

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Starting in September, you can get a minor in Africana Studies at Brock – ThoroldNews.com

By: ThoroldNews Staff

Brock University students will have the opportunity to pursue a Minor in Africana Studies in addition to their degrees starting this September. The university says the program will bring a new and broad perspective in understanding the challenges faced by people of African descent.

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United States appoints Damilola Ogunbiyi to Advisory Council of Development Finance Corporation

The United States International Development Finance Corporation (DFC) Board of Directors has approved the first members of the agency’s inaugural Development Advisory Council of which Nigeria’s Damilola Ogunbiyi is one.

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Around the world, the U.S. has long been a symbol of anti-black racism

By Nana Osei-Opare  | The Washington Post

The extrajudicial killing of George Floyd has sparked days of unrest and protest around the United States. What is less well known but no less important is how this event has sparked massive anti-racism protests around the world, including in Nairobi, Lagos, London, Berlin, Toronto and most recently, Paris.

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‘Soon he’ll be seen as threatening, not cute’: What it’s like to raise my black son in America

By Ifrah Udgoon | Mail & Guardian

As a Somali immigrant to America, I am expected to be grateful to be here. But have I sold my soul to the devil? Black mothers have much to fear when it comes to their children. American soil is saturated with the blood of black people: slavery, Jim Crow, mass incarceration and the war on drugs, and police brutality have ensured that black people know pain and loss intimately.

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African immigrants struggle to find place in US

by Jaya Padmanabhan | San Francisco Examiner

In Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s book “Americanah,” a young Nigerian woman, Ifemelu, comes to America and starts a blog about being a black person from another country. In one of her posts she writes, “Dear Non-American Black, when you make the choice to come to America, you become black. Stop arguing. Stop saying I’m Jamaican or I’m Ghanaian. America doesn’t care. So, what if you weren’t black in your country? You’re in America now.”

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