Category: Politics

Liberian refugee, Montana’s first black mayor launches bid for US Senate seat

By Kendall Karson

Wilmot Collins, the Liberian refugee who surged into national headlines in 2017 after becoming Montana’s first and only black mayor is launching a bid for higher office, officially filing paperwork with the FEC to run for the U.S. Senate seat currently held by incumbent GOP Sen. Steve Daines.

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South Africa’s ANC wins re-election with reduced majority


By Christopher Clark

ANC remains in power with 57.5 percent of vote, but the outcome is its worst-ever showing at the polls.

The ruling African National Congress (ANC) has won South Africa‘s parliamentary elections with 57.5 percent of the vote, the electoral commission said, announcing the official results. 

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South Africa elections: Incoming results suggest ruling ANC set to win diminished majority

By Euan McKirdy, David McKenzie and Deborah Bloom, CNN

Despite years of corruption allegations, a sluggish economy and sustained electricity blackouts, South Africa’s ruling ANC looks set to win a substantial majority in a critical national election.With three quarters of the vote counted, the ANC shows a strong lead with just over 57% of the national vote, according to partial results released by the country’s electoral commission.

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Nigerian-born Kelechi Madu sworn in as minister in Alberta, Canada

Following his election as a Member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Alberta (MLA) in Canada, Nigerian-born Kelechi (Kacyee) Madu has been sworn in and named as the Minister of Municipal Affairs.

Madu, 45, graduated with a bachelor of laws from the University of Lagos. He migrated to Canada in 2005 with his wife who enrolled in postgraduate studies at the University of Alberta.

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HOW THE BUILD ACT CAN INVIGORATE U.S. ECONOMIC TIES IN AFRICA

By Ed Royce and Robin Renee Sanders

Since the U.S. BUILD Act was signed into law last October, many people across Africa as well as members of the Africa Diaspora have been asking what this global initiative might do to help revitalize American engagement with the continent. The answer is: quite a lot!

The goal of BUILD or the — “Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development Act” – is exactly what the American private sector has long sought. BUILD does a number of positive things to boost the U.S.-Africa economic, business, and development relationship.

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Egyptians in Canada, US vote on constitutional amendments

The Egyptians living in the United States of America and Canada have started voting in the referendum on a set of proposed constitutional amendments, in the headquarters of the Egyptian embassies in Washington and Ottawa, and the consulate in New York.

Egyptian expatriates started a three-day voting on the new constitutional amendments in 140 embassies and consulates of 125 countries worldwide, amid massive campaigning for the amendments abroad and domestically.

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Nigerian-born Kelechi Madu Wins assembly seat in Alberta, Canada,

Nigerian-born Kelechi (Kacyee) Madu has been elected as a Member of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Alberta (MLA) in Canada.

The United Conservative Party candidate was declared the winner in Edmonton-South West in a close race against John Archer of the New Democrat Party with 62 of 64 polls reporting.

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Algerians In Diaspora Celebrate Bouteflika’s Resignation With Movement

For weeks, expat Algerians have been streaming home, some just for the weekend, to play their part in the historic changes sweeping the country.

“I took unpaid leave to come and march in Algeria, to be here physically,” said Chahrazade Kaci, who arrived back from London just days before president Abdelaziz Bouteflika resigned in the face of huge protests.

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Ghana President Examines U.S.–Ghana Relations, Foreign Investment at International House Talk

The Ghanaian President spoke about his plans for socioeconomic reform within the country.

By Oren Oppenheim

The president of Ghana, Nana Akufo-Addo, addressed tensions and opportunities between the United States and Ghana, calling for a new dynamic in the relationship between the countries during a discussion at the University’s International House on Monday.

The event, which the Institute of Politics (IOP) and International House co-hosted as part of the latter’s Global Voices Program, was one of Akufo-Addo’s stops on a longer United States trip. In Chicago, Akufo-Addo had spoken with Chicago-based Ghanaians on the previous day and met with Mayor Rahm Emanuel on the day of his IOP talk.

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Kenyans abroad give electoral body 30 days to register them as voters

By Ruth Mbula

Kenyans in the diaspora have given the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) 30 days to register them as voters.

For over a decade now, they have agitated for their right to vote but with little success.

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Somali-American Congresswoman ignites controversy in diverse Minneapolis

By Katherine Gypson

Representative Ilhan Omar has a way of attracting attention. Four months ago, the Democrat became the first Somali-American — and one of the first two Muslim women — to serve in the U.S. Congress.

Just weeks into her first congressional term, Omar ignited a controversy with a tweet invoking an offensive trope suggesting U.S. lawmakers’ support for Israel was swayed by money from the powerful lobbying group, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC).

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How Sudan’s uprising is inspiring a generation of Sudanese American teens

By Hana Baba

Nearly two dozen people are gathered for a symposium in Hayward, California, about the recent protests in Sudan. Those who come to these Sudan-related events are usually adults — first-generation Sudanese immigrants to the United States.

But it’s different tonight. The featured speakers are Sudanese American teenagers.

First up is 17-year-old Maazin Ahmed, whose mother is Sudanese and father is African American. Maazin is the president of his college’s Black Students Union in Berkeley, California, a city familiar with protests. He says he grew up seeing pictures of his mom sporting an afro in the 70s in Sudan. She told him stories about better times in her home country.

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4 things discussed during the US land expropriation talks in South Africa

A number of top US officials recently visited South Africa at the request of President Donald Trump as part of an investigation into the country’s land expropriation process.

The delegation, which included US Deputy Foreign Secretary John J. Sullivan, met with AgriSA, Grain SA, and ANC officials on Friday (15 March) to discuss how the land expropriation process may impact property rights in the country.

In a statement released on Monday, AgriSA outlined what was discussed in the meeting and the issues that were raised.

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Escalation in Somalia Is a Foreign Policy Failure in Progress

U.S. intervention quietly escalates in Somalia.

While the Trump administration has very visibly made and modified plans to reduce U.S. military intervention in Syria and Afghanistan, it has quietly escalated the fight in Somalia. U.S. airstrikes in the North African nation are on the rise, The New York Times reported Sunday, and that higher pace of bombardment has contributed to increased civilian displacement and all the turmoil that comes with it.

This is a foreign policy failure in progress. If the last two decades of missteps in the Middle East and North Africa have demonstrated anything, it is that secretive wars of choice are prone to mission creep and rife with unintended consequences. Rather than expand, U.S. military intervention in Somalia should be shut down before it spirals into another needless generational conflict.

The United States has had some military presence in Somalia for the better part of three decades, and the current campaign began in 2007. But U.S. strikes were few—zero to three per year—until 2015, when former President Barack Obama started an upward trend the Trump team has continued. Last year, U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) reported 47 strikes. The first two months of this year put us on track to triple that by December.

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US INVESTORS TO HELP BUILD AFRICA

By Bolaji Samuel

The tension between the two economic giants in the world, China and the United States (US), might have a silver lining for Africa. The administration of President Donald Trump is set to increase investment into the continent, in a bid to counter the narrative that China’s influence in Africa is rising, while the US falls off with its “America first” approach.

President Trump signed the legislation, the Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development Act, or the BUILD Act, into law in October 2018. It combines the US Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) and other US agencies focusing on international economic development into a newly consolidated agency called the U.S. International Development Finance Corporation (DFC).

It is anticipated that the DFC will be operational in October 2019 and at that time the DFC will begin deploying US equity capital in African private equity.
The DFC expands OPIC’s budget from USD29 billion to USD60 billion and provides the DFC with the authority to make limited equity investments. Previously, OPIC was limited to debt investments.

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