Dear Black America: You Should Be Paying Attention to Africa

By Patrick Washington | San Diego Voices and Viewpoints

In the last month of 2022, The United States hosted the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. The goal of this summit was to expand relations between the U.S. and the continent of Africa.

Well, really, it’s because China is kicking ass in diplomatic, economic, and virtually every other major area in Africa’s ascension, and the U.S. is woefully underprepared for a world where the world’s largest resources center and the world’s largest manufacturer get along — and the world’s most powerful nation isn’t invited to the cookout.

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CKay becomes best-selling African singer in USA with ‘Love Nwantiti’

By Adegboyega Adeleye | Vanguard

Afrobeats sensational superstar, Chukwuka Ekweani popularly known as CKay, has earned another recognition in his stellar career.

The talented singer, songwriter, and producer has reportedly been named the best-selling African artiste in the United States of America (USA) after his record-breaking international hit song ‘Love Nwantiti’ earned over 1.6 million dollars in 2022 — which is the largest amount ever achieved by an African artiste.

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Minnesota Africans United lobbies African Summit in support of Minnesota’s Expo 2027 Bid

By Al McFarlane | News Insight

Minnesota Africans United (MAU), behalf of Minnesota’s Expo 2027 bid, last week lobbied African leaders who were in Washington, DC attending President Biden’s US Africa Leaders’ Summit.

The United States is seeking to host the 2027 World Expo in Minnesota with the theme “Healthy People, Healthy Planet – Wellness and Well Being for All.”  If Minnesota is selected, this would be the first expo in the U.S. in nearly 40 years.

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African-American Diaspora Engagement at the Core of U.S.-African Relations in Multipolar World

By Kester Kenn Klomegah | Modern Diplomacy

The U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit held in Washington has placed African-American diaspora at the core for strengthening multifaceted  relations with Africa. The White House and African leaders have also stressed the importance of Africa’s voices, advocated for incorporating professional Africans distinctively within the institutional structures to deal with various bilateral issues and for making further inroads into Africa.

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4,916 Ghanaians schooling in USA

By Graphic Online

A total of 4,916 Ghanaian students studied in colleges and universities in the United States of America (USA) during the 2021-2022 academic year.

This represents a 16.2 per cent increase over the previous year.

According to the 2022 USA Open Doors Report, Ghana sent the second-highest number of students (second only to Nigeria) to the USA among the sub-Saharan African countries.

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Nigerian-born Amanda Azubuike now Brigadier General in US Army

By Wale Odunsi | Daily Post

A senior officer in the United States Army, Amanda Azubuike, has been promoted to Brigadier General rank.

Amanda, whose father and mother hail from Nigeria and Zimbabwe, serves at a military base in Fort Knox, Kentucky.

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African Diaspora Festival celebrates identity and culture at Underground Railroad Museum

By Valerie Russ | The Inquirer

When rain threatened early Sunday morning, some of the volunteers for the African Diaspora Festival in Burlington County wondered whether they should cancel the event.

But Louise Calloway, the 92-year-old founder of the Underground Railroad Museum in Eastampton, brushed aside the doubters.

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Mana Abdi | Somali American legislative candidate is poised to make history in the Maine Legislature

LEWISTON, Maine (AP) — A Democratic candidate is poised to become the first Somali American to serve in the Maine Legislature after her challenger dropped out of the race.

Republican Fred Sanborn-Silvers’ withdrawal last month cleared the path for Democrat Mana Abdi in her bid for Maine House District 95. Another Somali American, South Portland Mayor Deqa Dhalac, is also running for a different House seat.

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African Street Festival returns to Hadley Park September 16-18

By Cass Teague | Pride Publishing

Annual African Street Festival by the African American Cultural Alliance is on the weekend of September 16 through September 18, 2022 at Hadley Park, located at 1037 28th Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee. This year’s theme is “We Rise To the Beat Of Our Drums.” The upcoming community event will once again honor the legacy of Nashville Civil Rights / Community Activist Kwame Leo Lillard, the founder of the festival and the African American Cultural Alliance.

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U.S. Expects to Use All Employment-Based Green Cards This Year

By Michelle Hackman | Wall Street Journal

U.S. immigration authorities project that they will use up all the extra available employment-based green cards for the fiscal year ending this month, averting the risk that the government would for the second year running let thousands go to waste.

Typically, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, the agency that processes green cards and other immigration applications, hands out about 140,000 employment-based green cards to foreign employees and their families, representing a fraction of demand that results in a decadelong wait for some applicants.

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St. Louis police shoot and kill Sudanese man after standoff

ST. LOUIS (AP) — St. Louis police shot and killed a 61-year-old Sudanese refugee after he reportedly lunged at an officer after a long standoff, authorities said.

The confrontation on Wednesday began when officers were serving felony warrants for assault, resisting arrest and a weapons charge, Lt. John Green said.

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Biden to meet South Africa leader amid differences on Russia

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will meet with South African President Cyril Ramaphosa this month, the White House announced Thursday, as the administration looks to draw African nations closer to the U.S. at a time when South Africa and many of its neighbors have staked out neutral ground on Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

Announcement of the Sept. 16 visit comes on the heels of U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s visit to South Africa last month, in which he said the Biden administration sees Africa’s 54 nations as “equal partners” in tackling global problems.

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Artist Oluseye Ogunlesi builds a Black Ark to explore Canada’s colonial history

BY BETTY WOOD | THE SPACES

What looks like the hull of a long-lost ship has appeared at Toronto’s Ashbridges Bay – a haunting installation by Nigerian-Canadian artist Oluseye Ogunlesi exploring Canada’s ‘forgotten’ role in the Trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Dubbed Black Ark, the 12-ft-tall immersive sculptural installation is presented as part of the Luminato Toronto Arts Festival. It’s conceived as a ‘symbolic home’ to commemorate the survivors of slavery, with its form evoking both the pitched silhouette of a chapel and the bow of a ship.

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DOES ‘BOUND: AFRICANS VS. AFRICAN-AMERICANS’ HAVE A POINT?

By TeamEbony | Ebony

“Africans owe African-Americans an apology for slavery” is one of the incendiary remarks and fiery cultural topics director Peres Owino covers in her latest no-flex-zone feature-length documentary, Bound: Africans vs. African Americans. Owino, a self-professed hot sample of Kenyan coco, has directed a film that will have viewers question their love of Black culture and historical stereotypes they didn’t realize they held on to day to day. Bound is a straight shot to the cerebral cortex challenge of our approach to race, gender and relations.

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Vestine Ncungu survived genocide in Rwanda. Now she is using her experience to help others heal


By EILEEN O’GRADY | Concord Monitor

Vestine Ncungu was 11 when she had to run for her life and hide in the trees to escape militia soldiers who were killing members of her ethnic group during the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Most of her family members didn’t make it out alive. She was one of the lucky ones who escaped. She stayed safe with what remained of her extended family and eventually got permission to come to the United States as a young woman.

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Why Nigeria is the only African country excluded from 2023 DV-Visa Lottery

By Biodun Busari | Vanguard

The United States has excluded Nigeria from its 2023 Diversity Immigrant Visa programme which is also known as the green card lottery.

Nigeria’s exclusion from the programme makes it eight years in a row that the US ignored the most populous African country in the world among immigrants entering via DVL.

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Uchenna Nicholas Opara |This Nigerian student mopped floors to pay for his Canadian degree

By RYNNAAS AZLAN | Study International

When the sun goes down, most Canadians are already warm in their houses, eating dinner and unwinding from a long day at work. For Nigerian student Uchenna Nicholas Opara, it was time to clock in and start mopping floors at an office complex for 14 Canadian dollars an hour.

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Dr. Phillip Ozuah| New York based Nigerian doctor donates 1M Dollars to University of Ibadan

By Ebimo Amungo

A Nigerian-born physician who is based in New York has donated one million dollars to his alma mata, the University of Ibadan in South West Nigeria. Dr. Philip Ozuah made the donation to the school during a fundraiser organised by the university.

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In-Memoriam: Professor Fassil Nebebe

By Paulos Milkias| borkena

An unsung hero, a great Ethiopian, Professor Fassil Nebebe, suddenly passed away in Montreal, Canada on August 23, 2022. As citizens of Ethiopia by far control,  Dr. Fassil and I started to teach at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada at the same time, in 1986: he in Statistics and I in Political Science. Because of his gregarious nature, it did not take me time to befriend him. He immediately became a trusted comrade, a brother in spirit, and a trustworthy advisor when I needed him. 

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The Good and Bad Continuity of Biden’s New Africa Strategy

The Biden strategy document fails to take a “whole of Africa” approach that Africans themselves embrace and instead reverts to the Obama-era billing of a “Sub-Saharan Africa” focus.

by J. Peter Pham Samuel B. Millner

The Biden administration’s new U.S. Strategy Toward Sub-Saharan Africa, unveiled during Secretary of State Antony Blinken’s recent swing through the continent, reflects little more than a commitment to the status quo. Despite the White House’s attempt to spin it as a “new vision for a 21st Century U.S.-African Partnership,” Africa watchers on and off the continent will note that much remains unchanged, both for good and for ill.

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United States Enters into Agreement with Nigeria to Repatriate Over $23 Million in Assets Stolen by Former Nigerian Dictator

From USJF

The United States, through the Department of Justice and FBI, forfeited approximately $23 million traceable to the corruption and money laundering of former Nigerian dictator Sani Abacha and his co-conspirators. This money will be returned to the Nigerian people through an agreement between the Governments of the United States and the Federal Republic of Nigeria (Nigeria) signed today in Abuja, Nigeria, by U.S. Ambassador Mary Beth Leonard. This repatriation will bring the total amount forfeited and returned by the Department of Justice in this case to approximately $334.7 million. 

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Algerian rapper Soolking plays Harlem’s Apollo during debut US tour

New York (AFP) – As his merengue-inflected single “Suavemente” once again topped France’s songs chart, Algerian rapper Soolking was stateside, delighting fans and wooing new followers with his blend of rap and Maghrebian folk music.

Already acclaimed in the Francophone world, the Algerian rapper Soolking this year set his sights on North America, where he played historic venues including New York’s Apollo and the Globe Theatre in Los Angeles.

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WITH BIGGER THAN AFRICA, TOYIN ADEKEYE UNIFIES PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENTS

By SHAIBU HUSSEINI | The Guardian Newspaper

Although he has been touring festivals worldwide screening his first feature documentary, Bigger Than Africa, Toyin Ibrahim Adekeye’s dream was to have the cultural documentary stream on a global platform so that more people will get to see the film outside festivalgoers.

That dream came through for the filmmaker and President of Motherland Productions in Los Angeles on May 13, 2022, when the documentary film about the journey of enslaved Africans through the lens of the Yoruba culture of West Africa debuted on the global streaming platform Netflix.

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Boubini Miyensinte Jones-Wonni | 22 year Old NIgerian is best graduating Medical Student in Howard University, gains scholarship to Harvard Medical School

By Ebimo Amungo

Boubini Miyensinte Jones-Wonni, a 22 year old Nigerian has not only become the youngest and best graduting student of Howard University she has also won a scholarship to Havard for her residency program in internal medicine

Jones-Wonni was born in Ido-ani, a town in Ondo state , Nigeria, on the 23rd of October 1999 to the family of Dr and Mrs Jones-Wonni. She hails from Arogbo Ese- Odo local government area of Ondo State.

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Common mistakes Nigerians make in America – Model Joseph Water

By Vanguard Newspaper

From his wealth of knowledge and experience, Nigerian-American model Babalola Otitoju Joseph better known as Joseph Water has offered nuggets of advice to young Nigerians hoping to migrate to America and follow in his footsteps.

The 28-year-old seasoned model advised: “Firstly, they need a great dose of self-belief and tenacity to follow their dreams. They need to also understand the nuances of modelling; it is way more than having a pretty face and being photogenic.

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Montgomery College Professor Receives Fulbright Scholarship to study Ghana’s Mediated Call on The Year of Return.

By Suzanne Pollak | mymcm

Montgomery College Professor Tiffany Thames Copeland received a Fulbright U.S. Scholarship award in communications from the U.S. Department of State and the Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board.

During the 2022-2023 school year, she will research “African Americans Respond to Ghana’s Mediated Call: Digital Media & The Year of Return.”

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Mandela Washington Fellowship returns to App State in summer 2022

By Jessica Stump | Appalachian Today

BOONE, N.C. — Appalachian State University has been selected as an Institute Partner for the 2022 Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. Beginning in mid-June, App State will host 25 of Africa’s bright, emerging Civic Engagement leaders for a six-week, on-campus Leadership Institute, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State.

The Mandela Washington Fellowship, the flagship program of the Young African Leaders Initiative (YALI), empowers young African leaders through academic coursework, leadership training, mentoring, networking, professional opportunities and local community engagement.

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How Asantehene rounded off activities marking 44th Memphis in May festival

BY: Kwame Asare Boadu | Graphic Online

The rich culture of Asante was in full display in Memphis, USA on Saturday, May 7, when a durbar of Asanteman was held to round off activities marking the 44th Memphis in May International Festival.

The durbar featured the Asantehene, Otumfuo Osei Tutu II, who sat in state to receive homage from Ghanaians including his subjects and other well wishers.

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How the United States Can Shape Africa’s Future

by Dramane Chabi Bouko | NATIONAL INTEREST

The Department of State’s Bureau of Africa Affairs provides three core objectives for U.S. foreign policy towards Africa: “1) Advancing trade and commercial ties with key African states to increase the U.S. and African prosperity; 2) Protecting the United States from cross-border health and security threats; and 3) Supporting key African states’ progress toward stability, citizen-responsive governance, and self-reliance.”

Examining these objectives and their on-the-ground impacts, separating health and security threats, creates four unique strategic priorities.

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Kenneth Anga elected Chairman of Ijaw National Congress in North America.

By Ebimo Amungo

Mr Kenneth Ibiene Anga, a longtime resident of Houston, Texas, has been elected Chairman of the Ijaw National Congress in North America. The Ijaw National Congress is the premier socio-cultural organization of the Ijaw Ethnic Nationality in Nigeria. Mr Anga was elected by delegates from across America in an election that was held over zoom on Saturday 7th May 2022.

Mr. Anga would lead a new Executive Committee that is tasked with the responsibilities of directing the affairs of the organization in America and Canada for the next four years.

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