The Senegalese Chef Behind America’s New Favorite Supergrain

Pierre Thiam used to have to smuggle fonio from West Africa into the U.S. Now he’s getting it into as many of the country’s restaurants and grocery stores as he can.

BY 

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African food truck diversifies food scene in West Campus in Austin, Texas

BY SARA JOHNSON

A new food truck opened last Wednesday behind the University Co-op, bringing the taste of African cuisine closer to campus.

African Delights offers a small, seasonal menu of West African cuisine and operates between 11:30 a.m. and 2:45 p.m., according to a sign on the front of the food truck.

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International Rescue Committee working to transition refugees coming to the Capital City

By Sophia Hernandez 

Think about this: You are 14 or 15-years-old. You are moving to a new country, don’t know the language, the customs or culture of where you now live.

That’s where the International Rescue Committee in Tallahassee comes in to help.

In February, the group created it’s first literacy program. Now, 44 Congolese students and counting from grades 6 to 12, are not only learning English, but also ways to transition into American society.

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Outrage as African Union Fires Envoy in US

By Kudakwasahe Mugari

The dismissal of outspoken Zimbabwe-born African Union Ambassador to the United States, Dr Arikana Chihombori-Quao on Monday, has angered many Africans around the globe, prompting an online petition that had by last night attracted at least 15 000 signatures.

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The other African-Americans

The African-born migrant population is doubling every decade.


“I just came to hustle,” explains Gabriel, a recent migrant, as he wields an electric razor to sculpt an impressive structure from a teenage customer’s hair. During shifts at Afrikiko Hair & Fashion Boutique, in northern Chicago, he gets the chance to display a range of skills. Not least, his gift for languages: he speaks four, all from Ghana, besides English. Mostly he chatters in Twi, the most popular tongue in the west-African country.

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Kenya’s Brigid Kosgei Breaks Marathon World Record in Chicago

A record that seemed untouchable for years fell in 2:14:04. The run whacked 81 seconds off the previous women’s mark. 


By Matthew Futterman and Talya Minsberg

This city lived up to its billing as host of America’s fastest major marathon on Sunday as Brigid Kosgei of Kenya set a women’s world record.

A day after Eliud Kipchoge broke the two-hour barrier for the 26.2-mile distance, albeit in an event that did not count as a world record, his countrywoman Kosgei shattered Paula Radcliffe’s world marathon record, which no woman had come close to in the past 16 years.

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African migration to the United States is the fastest-rising—in spite of Trump

By Chidinma Irene Nwoye & Dan Kopf

Africa has the fastest-growing number of immigrants in the United States, according to a Quartz analysis of US Census Bureau data.

The number of African migrants grew at a rate of almost 50% from 2010 to 2018. This is more than double the growth rate of migration to the US from Asia, South America or the Caribbean.

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The resilience of Kenyan immigrants in the US

The land of opportunity promises wealth and a new beginning for many Kenyans at a crossroads with needy relatives back home, but life in America is not a bed of roses

• Of the 120,000 Kenyans in America, 35% (42,000) don’t have legal resident status

• They live in constant fear, cannot travel freely, and do odd jobs for a living, but many have overcome the odds to succeed 

By Elizabeth Mwarage

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‘Limitless Africans’ Is a Stunning Snapshot of LGBTQ African Immigrant Lives

Photographer Mikael Owunna’s series started as a personal journey of seeking community.

By Jonathan Feinstein

For much of his life, photographer Mikael Owunna felt estranged wherever he turned. Born and raised in Pittsburgh, PA to parents who immigrated from Nigeria, his immigrant status and Blackness led to a constant feeling of otherness in the United States, while his sexuality was perceived as “un-African” and not “of our culture” to his African circles.

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How one Congolese refugee’s organizing efforts helped integrate his community into King County

By Amanda Mancenido, Communities of Opportunity

Floribert Mubalama knows firsthand that it can be hard to find your footing when you transition to life in America as a refugee or immigrant. I met Mubalama through the Congolese Integration Network (CIN), an organization part of the growing group of partners supported by Communities of Opportunity to strengthen the connections that cultural groups have to their communities.

Mubalama courageously shared his story to help affirm that isolation is a common experience for many refugees and immigrants and that becoming involved with cultural community organizations can break that isolation and help people thrive emotionally and economically.

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‘Zulu Wedding’ Director Eager For South  Africans To See Movie

By Fatima Moosa

The Zulu Wedding is finally releasing in cinemas. The movie’s release has been delayed many times in the past two years. The movie is about Lu (Nondumiso Tembe) a dancer from South Africa who is currently working in America. She falls in love with Tex (Darrin Dewitt Henson). However, there’s a problem – Lu has been promised to marry a Zulu prince (Pallance Dladla). Returning home to South Africa with Tex, Lu has to navigate the complication that is her life. The Daily Vox team spoke to about the film’s director Lineo Sekeleoane. 

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Ethiopian PM Abiy Ahmed Ali wins Nobel Peace Prize

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali of Ethiopia has won the 2019 Nobel Peace Prize, the awards committee announced in Norway on Friday.

He was recognised for starting peace talks with Eritrea and establishing a peace agreement to end the long stalemate between the two countries.

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Liberians allege racial animus behind Trump’s decision not to extend protection from deportation

By Brad Petrishen

The former top lawyer for the city of Philadelphia, with more than 70 Liberians sitting behind him Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Worcester, argued that racial animus was behind President Donald J. Trump’s decision to not extend a program that has allowed Liberian refugees to stay in America for decades.

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Magic forward Al-Farouq Aminu gives back to Nigeria, where his grandfather was a king

By STEPHEN RUIZ

Chris Kaman started it.

When Magic forward Al-Farouq Aminu entered the NBA with the Los Angeles Clippers in 2010, he stood in front of the team and talked about himself as part of his indoctrination into the league. One of the factoids that Aminu mentioned was that his surname, Oloyede, means “Chief has arrived” in his family’s native Nigeria.

Thus, a nickname was born.

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Author from Ghana visits Livingstone College on American book tour

As part of his American book tour, author Kojo Yankah of Ghana visited Livingstone College last week and lectured in DaTarvia Parrish’s African American history class.

As part of his American book tour, author Kojo Yankah of Ghana, right, visited Livingstone College last week. At left is college President Jimmie R. Jenkins.

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