African migrants stuck in southern Mexico, their American dream on hold

By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL 

“Africa weeps. Free us.”

That’s the message handwritten in French and Spanish on a protest bannerat a tent city here in the southernmost tip of Mexico.

The tents belong to some 250 African nationals who crossed jungles, forded rivers, sneaked across borders and dodged militias and thieves to get here in hopes of eventually reaching the United States. But now they are stuck, because Mexico has denied them the travel visas necessary to proceed north.

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Kenyan wins 2019 Montreal Marathon after race starts with 50-minute delay

Boniface Kongin of Kenya won the Montreal marathon on Sunday, finishing the 42-kilometre race in two hours, 15 minutes and 18 seconds. He beat Mohamed Aagab of Morocco (2:19:43) and fellow Kenyan Isaac Maiyo (2:23:17) to the finish line at Place des Arts.

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The seminal Hollywood movie on apartheid South Africa and its pioneering black female director

By Nadia Neophytou

When Euzhan Palcy released the second film she’d ever made, A Dry White Season, in 1989, she wrote herself into the history of filmmaking, becoming the first black female filmmaker to helm a studio movie—one with big name actors and a budget to go along with it. It should have heralded a new era in her life, as a filmmaker of note, but it’s only now, 30 years later, that she looks set to return to her love of cinema.

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Diaspora Showcase brings African culture to Tucson

By Rogelio Mares

The history of African Americans in Tucson is rich, full of names, dates and titles.

During segregation if you were black you could only learn that history at the Dunbar Academy.

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Canada PM, Trudeau, seeks Nigerian journalist’s help for reelection

As Canadians prepare for the House of Commons election, incumbent Prime Minister, Justin Trudeau, has solicited the help of a Nigerian journalist, Chief Olufemi Shodunke, to return to office for another four years.

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Folake Olowofoyeku hearts life in the television comedy lane

By LEANNE ITALIE

A funny thing happened to Folake Olowofoyeku on the way to a career in law: She became a theater major against her parents’ wishes and headed straight into the business after earning her undergraduate degree.
Her Nigerian parents were so hell-bent on launching her into the family profession of law that they named her after the first female Senior Advocate of Nigeria, a title conferred on legal practitioners who have distinguished themselves.

A similar scenario is present for Olowofoyeku in “Bob Hearts Abishola,” her CBS comedy series.

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Hating Immigrants: America’s self-destructive tradition

By Osa Fasehun

I was a sophomore at Bowdoin when Donald Trump was gaining momentum in the presidential election in spite of his xenophobic rhetoric. Anxiously dreading a near-fascist regime in the event of a Trump presidency, I talked with my mother about getting reacquainted with Nigeria, my mother’s native country.

The talk did not go well and after debating the idea for an hour, my mother finally admitted, “We have no place to go! The Nigeria I knew in childhood doesn’t exist anymore. I would be a foreigner in my own country.”

What I initially took for exasperation in her tone was actually broken-heartedness. She had fond childhood memories of Nigeria as a beautiful and safe black country, so it pained her to know that I did not feel at home in America—my country—and that she could not provide me with an alternative.

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They may not have won America’s Got Talent, but Ndlovu Youth Choir stirred our souls

By Aisha Salaudeen, CNN

Their incredible run on America’s Got Talent may have come to a halt in Wednesday night’s final but Ndlovu Youth Choir succeeded in winning hearts and minds around the world with their soul-stirring performances.

The South African youth choir’s powerful rendition of ‘Toto’s Africa’ on launched them into the finals, making them the first African act to do so.

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Guinean President Visits US, Faces Term Limit Questions

By Salem Solomon, Abdourahmane Dia, James Butty

As Guinea’s president visits the U.S. preaching economic development, a debate rages back home about term limits.

President Alpha Condé spent the week visiting U.S. diplomats, granting interviews and meeting with business leaders. He said his goal is to attract investment and transform his country’s economy, which historically has been heavily dependent on mineral extraction.

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Former Kenyan Athlete to be Inducted into Athletics Hall-of-Fame in Iowa


Retired Kenyan athlete Barnaba Korir is to be inducted to Iowa State Athletics Hall-of-Fame.

Korir, who currently serves as Athletics Kenya (AK) director in charge of youth and development, is among six sports personalities who will be inducted to Iowa State Athletics Hall-of-Fame.

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Africa-America Institute Set to Honor Angola During 35th Annual Awards Gala

The Africa-America Institute (AAI) will celebrate African success during its 35th Annual Awards Gala on September 24, 2019. The highly anticipated event will take place at the American Museum of Natural History, a cultural hallmark of New York City’s Upper West Side. 

To commemorate the 400-year anniversary of the first Africans brought to the U.S. from Angola in 1619, AAI will bestow the New York Times Magazine with its Excellence in Journalism Award for their groundbreaking, “1619 Project”. AAI will also honor the Republic of Angola with the National Achievement Award, in recognition of the country’s peaceful transition and reform agenda.  

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The House Next Door: Africa and America find a home in Edgewood, Pittsburgh

PATRICIA SHERIDAN

A war was raging, and the Mufukas had to find a way out of Rhodesia (Zimbabwe). It was 1969.

“My parents had to figure out how to leave the country,” said Lois Mufuka Martin, who was only 18 months old at the time.

Today she and her husband, Derek Martin, live in a large, century-old home in Edgewood, Pittsburgh

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Egyptian Coffee Shop in New York stakes claim to being first hookah lounge in America

Sip coffee and talk politics at this landmark cafe in Astoria’s Little Egypt, a contender for the title of America’s first hookah bar. 

By REINA GATTUSO

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Kenyan who is World’s best teacher meets US President Donald Trump in White House

Peter Tabichi from Kenya, who was named World’s Best Teacher earlier this year, has met US President Donald Trump at the White House ahead of a speech he is giving at the UN General Assembly.

Brother Tabichi, a member of the Franciscan religious order, won the 2019 Global Teacher Prize in March.

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Part two: Why Kenyans going to diaspora never come back

Over the last 15-20 years, the Kenyan Community in the United States has completely expanded and spread across almost every state in America.What are the implications of the expansion of the community and how they relate to Kenya?

This is a public park in the city of Townsend Delaware on a beautiful summer afternoon on the east coast of the USA.Kenyans living in the state arrive one by one and by sunset, the park will be full of Kenyans.

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