Tag: African food in America

She forgot her childhood in Nigeria. Then she ate moi moi at Charlotte’s Cooking Pot

I must introduce you to an old family friend of mine: moi moi. It’s a simple dish of humble ingredients: steamed black-eyed peas, mostly, with a few garnishes tucked in for flash. But food, like other aspects of culture, is more than the sum of its parts. Moi moi is one of the ways I found home, and the first dish that I thought of when I was asked to produce this series on African diasporic foods.

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Toyin Kolawole | Iya Foods founder leverages her Nigerian roots to tap into a new market

After CEO Toyin Kolawole noticed there wasn’t adequate representation for African-inspired flavors on U.S. grocery shelves, she began pitching her products at trade shows and to buyers.

By Lillianna Byington’s | FoodDive

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Afra Grill | A place for Somali gourmet, with characteristics of Indian, Mediterranean, and Ethiopian food.

By G.A. Benton | Columbus Monthly

Few new eateries embodied the spirit of Columbus in 2020 like Afra Grill on the city’s North Side.  It’s a pandemic-practical operation that’s inexpensive, offers an easy online ordering system, a handy drive-thru window and a sparkling dining room with a starkly impactful design scheme. 

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West African fufu is the latest viral food on TikTok

By ARIT JOHN | Los Angeles Times

Joeneen Hull had never tried fufu, but for weeks the 31-year-old nail artist watched mukbangs of people dipping warm chunks of starchy dough into rich, spicy soups.

“One day, I was just like, ‘you know what? Today’s gonna be the day’,” she said. “I’m craving it so bad. I don’t even know what this food tastes like and I’m craving it.”

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My auntie’s jollof rice, and other things Covid-19 stole from me

by S. Fambul | The Counter

We West Africans take our regional dish—and communal celebration—seriously. When I remember the days when an unmasked face at the bank did not frighten me, I cannot help but to think of the ways I have called my family outside of their names in the act of love.

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New Jersey restaurants: Where to taste the foods of the African diaspora

When it comes to food, those who aren’t lucky enough to call New Jersey home think the Garden State is only good for a few things. Pizza, bagels, and that beloved salty breakfast meat are our calling cards (and we would add top-notch Italian and fresher-than-fresh seafood, too). But beyond the Parmigiana and pork roll is a world of cuisines some might not expect. Ethiopian, Ghanaian, Nigerian, Moroccan, Caribbean, Southern and soul food: These are the cuisines of the African diaspora.

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Yewande Komolafe’s 10 Essential Nigerian Recipes

“We don’t say a dish is spicy — we say it has pepper.” The recipe writer Yewande Komolafe, who grew up in Lagos and found herself searching for the heat and flavor of Nigerian food in New York, chooses the dishes that define the cuisine for her.

By Yewande Komolafe | New York Times

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Niyi Okuboyejo | A Designer’s Endlessly Adaptable Nigerian Stew

By Nick Marino | The New York Times

Nigerian cuisine revolves around starches, stews and soups served in celebratory portions. “We don’t sit down and have light bites of food,” says Niyi Okuboyejo, the Lagos-born fashion designer behind the New York-based men’s wear brand Post-Imperial.

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Marcus Samuelsson | Ethiopian-born adoptee who came to America with $300 and became a world-famous chef

By Tom Huddleston Jr. | CNBC

Marcus Samuelsson is one of the most famous chefs in the world: an entrepreneur and culinary star with a long list of TV and book credits as well as ownership of a namesake global hospitality group that includes over a dozen restaurants headlined by three locations of his Red Rooster restaurant brand.

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