Tag: African restaurants in America

West African fufu is the latest viral food on TikTok

By ARIT JOHN | Los Angeles Times

Joeneen Hull had never tried fufu, but for weeks the 31-year-old nail artist watched mukbangs of people dipping warm chunks of starchy dough into rich, spicy soups.

“One day, I was just like, ‘you know what? Today’s gonna be the day’,” she said. “I’m craving it so bad. I don’t even know what this food tastes like and I’m craving it.”

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Chef Tunde Wey | Meet Nigerian-Born, American Culinary Expert.

By Modern Ghana

Akintunde Asuquo Osaigbuovo Ojo Wey, popularly known as Tunde Wey, is a New Orleans-based writer, activist-artist, and celebrity chef. Tunde was born in 1983 to a comfortably middle-class Yoruba family; his grandfather had been second-in-command during the military junta that ruled the country from 1966 to 1979. Tunde was born in Lagos, Nigeria, before moving to Detroit, Michigan at age 16 to complete his education.

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New Jersey restaurants: Where to taste the foods of the African diaspora

When it comes to food, those who aren’t lucky enough to call New Jersey home think the Garden State is only good for a few things. Pizza, bagels, and that beloved salty breakfast meat are our calling cards (and we would add top-notch Italian and fresher-than-fresh seafood, too). But beyond the Parmigiana and pork roll is a world of cuisines some might not expect. Ethiopian, Ghanaian, Nigerian, Moroccan, Caribbean, Southern and soul food: These are the cuisines of the African diaspora.

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Six Fantastic East African Eateries to Dig Into in the twin cities

by Julie Zhou | Eater Twin Cities

In addition to the abundance of Ethiopian and Eritrean eateries along St. Paul’s University and Snelling, the Twin Cities are home to a wealth of restaurants reflecting cuisines from other communities within the East African diaspora: milky, fragrant cups of shaah from Somalia, seared beef suqaar, tender, puffed flats of Yemeni mulawah.

Here are six favorites across Minneapolis and St. Paul.

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Chef Marcus Samuelsson celebrates the variety of Black food

By MARK KENNEDY | AP

NEW YORK (AP) — If anyone asks chef Marcus Samuelsson what African food taste like, he has a ready answer: Have you ever had barbeque? Rice? Collard greens? Okra? Coffee?

“All of that food comes from Africa, has its roots in Africa,” says the Ethiopian Swedish writer and restaurateur. “Everyone has had African American dishes, whether they know it or not.”

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‘Coffee is everything’ for this immigrant duo running Louisville’s new Ethiopian cafe

By Dahlia Ghabour | Louisville Courier Journal

In the middle of the summer, a new specialty coffee shop opened in Louisville with little fanfare. Cousins Tar Molla and Kidest Getachew aren’t really about recognition — except for the detailed and expert way they make their coffee. 

The pair, who immigrated from Ethiopia to the U.S. more than 10 years ago, opened Abol Cafe to share their love of coffee with Louisville. 

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Tiffaney and Avo Odewale | Husband-and-wife team set to open Jollof Rice Destination in Houston

by Kayla Stewart | Eater Houston

Jollof Rice King, a new destination for Nigerian cuisine, is just about ready to make its Houston debut. Located at 3833 Richmond Avenue, the exciting new addition to the city’s dining scene is set to open its doors on October 13, after multiple delays caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

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New York Biltong Is a New South African Shop in NYC

By Kayla Stewart | GrubStreet

When Brittney Brothers first tried the South African staple known as biltong, she was surprised by the way it didn’t taste. It looks salty, tough, and chewy, like jerky and other cured meats. But biltong was more delicate. “The seasonings compliment the natural flavor of the beef,” she says. “And it was very tender, unlike anything I’ve tasted before.” For her, it became a point of fascination. And now, it’s a career.

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Abena Oteng-Appiah | Some of the tastiest chicken you eat in Hampton Roads will be at Ghanaian restaurant Yendidi

By MATTHEW KORFHAGETHE | VIRGINIAN-PILOT

You’d be forgiven if you didn’t notice Yendidi from the outside. The restaurant in Norfolk’s Norview Heights neighborhood is backed off of a flyby stretch of Chesapeake Boulevard, nestled into a mini-mall next to a church and a hair salon. Its parking lot amounts to a ribbon of rough pavement against the roadside.

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Simileoluwa Adebajo | A Fire Destroyed San Francisco’s only Nigerian Restaurant but the owner Is Already Rebuilding It.

by Eve Batey | Eater

This was supposed to be a story about how the owner of San Francisco’s only Nigerian restaurant made a bold move to save her business, shuttering her dining room, pivoting to a takeout and delivery model, and moving her operation into a commissary kitchen. That’s not what this story is about anymore, however, because , a gigantic, six-building blaze destroyed it all.

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