Tag: African diaspora in America

Why No One Is Discussing the Rise in Africans Migrants Piled at U.S.-Mexico Border

By David Love

The subject of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border conjures images of people from Latin America, particularly Central America, who are fleeing poverty and violence. However, the dynamics of migration into the U.S. are changing. Increasingly, many migrants crossing the border are from nations in Africa and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, making asylum seekers and the border a Black issue as well.

Continue reading “Why No One Is Discussing the Rise in Africans Migrants Piled at U.S.-Mexico Border”
Advertisements

Kenyan author and blogger, Janet Rangi, writes book on how immigrants can secure success in America

Hilary Kimuyu

In 2003 a go-getting Kenyan nurse called Janet Kisaka Rangi found out that an application process she had begun with some agents in Nairobi had borne fruit. She had an opportunity to move to the United States.

She quit her nursing job at Aga Khan University hospital after working for a year. She packed her belongings, left her husband behind and flew off to America, all this while expecting her first child.

Continue reading “Kenyan author and blogger, Janet Rangi, writes book on how immigrants can secure success in America”

Delou Africa, Inc. Will Host African Diaspora Dance & Drum Festival of Florida in August

Delou Africa, Inc. will celebrate its 10 year anniversary by hosting the African Diaspora Dance & Drum Festival of Florida on August 2-4, 2019 at Little Haiti Cultural Complex (212 NE 59th Terrace, Miami, FL 33137).

“Our yearly festival is a springboard to community capacity building, to increase understanding within and between communities and to stimulate dialogue and increase awareness and sensitivity for culture within the African Diaspora,” says Njeri Plato, Executive Director, Delou Africa, Inc.

Continue reading “Delou Africa, Inc. Will Host African Diaspora Dance & Drum Festival of Florida in August”

CNN Star Quit to Pen Book About Nigerian Schoolgirls Kidnapping: “I Didn’t Want to Do Any More Trump”

Isha Sesay left cable news to write about her time covering the 2014 abduction of 276 Chibok schoolgirls by the terrorist organization Boko Haram: “An ‘othering’ of Africa still exists in newsrooms.”

Isha Sesay became a TV news star in 2014, leading a CNN news team to a Peabody Award with her coverage of the kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls in Chibok, Nigeria, by the Boko Haram terrorist group.

Continue reading “CNN Star Quit to Pen Book About Nigerian Schoolgirls Kidnapping: “I Didn’t Want to Do Any More Trump””

‘The new diaspora is riding on the sacrifices of the old diaspora,’ and other takeaways from a black leaders roundtable

By Valerie Russ

It was the evening before Independence Day, and about 40 black people whose families had come from around the globe gathered at S.A. Cafe in Upper Darby to talk about an independence of their own.

This was the first Diaspora Leaders Roundtable, sponsored by FunTimes magazine publisher Eric Nzeribe, for people of African descent — African-Americans, African immigrants, and African-Caribbeans — to talk about bridging cultural divides and building a future together.

Continue reading “‘The new diaspora is riding on the sacrifices of the old diaspora,’ and other takeaways from a black leaders roundtable”

Royal Air Maroc connects new England to Africa

By Iuliia Tore

Massport and Royal Air Maroc officials celebrated a new international service to Casablanca, Morocco, the first nonstop route from Boston Logan International Airport to mainland Africa. Boston is Royal Air Maroc’s fourth destination in the United States.

Continue reading “Royal Air Maroc connects new England to Africa”

Mandela Washington Fellows make stop in Williamsburg, learn from local leaders


By SaraRose Martin

A group of 25 young Africans with passions for journalism, human rights, law, gender equality, peace and nonprofit work stayed in Williamsburg the past two weeks for an exchange of ideas on civic leadership.

They are part of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. The program that started in 2014 invites 700 leaders, ages 25-35 from 49 Sub-Saharan African countries to the United States each year.

Continue reading “Mandela Washington Fellows make stop in Williamsburg, learn from local leaders”

Mandela Washington fellows from Africa sharpen leadership skills in Boise, Idaho

Doctors, lawyers and public servants from Africa are in the City of Trees for six weeks.

By Shirah Matsuzawa


BOISE, Idaho — What could be learned in Boise and brought back to Africa? Twenty-five young African leaders are in the City of Trees to find out.  They’re here as part of the U.S. State Department’s Mandela Washington Fellowship. 

The goal is to exchange ideas and perspectives with each other and Americans in hopes of taking that knowledge back home. The program began in 2014, but this is the first time fellows have come to Boise.

Continue reading “Mandela Washington fellows from Africa sharpen leadership skills in Boise, Idaho”

Candace Owens sparks twitter storm following remarks about Nigerian-Americans

by  Nurudeen Lawal –

American conservative commentator and political activist Candace Owens is known for her pro-Trump activism and her criticism of the Democratic Party. In a tweet that is trending on Twitter, Owens claimed that Nigerian-Americans are the most successful ethnic group in the United States; more successful than blacks of over-privileged America.

She also asserted that the success achieved by Nigerians is because they are not exposed to the “Democrat parasite of victimhood!”

Continue reading “Candace Owens sparks twitter storm following remarks about Nigerian-Americans”

Ugandans in the diaspora told to unite

By Henry Sekanjako

Ugandans living in the diaspora have been implored to avoid divisions and work together for a better Uganda.

“We cannot liberate Uganda with a divided and disorganized diaspora. We are all for a better Uganda.

A United and organized diaspora community will have so much to offer for the motherland,” Eng. John Julius Muwulya, the Vice President of the Uganda North America Association (UNAA) said.

Continue reading “Ugandans in the diaspora told to unite”

Samini To Thrill Fans at GhanaFest in Chicago

By Daily Guide

Samini has been invited to perform at this year’s edition of the Ghana Festival of Arts & Culture (GhanaFest), which is slated for July 27 & 28 at the Park 5600 Russel DR, Chicago IL in the United States of America (USA).

Continue reading “Samini To Thrill Fans at GhanaFest in Chicago”

Lazy people don’t immigrate; hopeful hard workers do


By Amgad Naguib

Earlier this year I was at my local gas station at 6 a.m. stocking up on caffeine for the daily commute. I joked with the young Ethiopian attendant about how haggard he looked and how happy he must be to get some rest after a graveyard shift.

Continue reading “Lazy people don’t immigrate; hopeful hard workers do”

Somali and American: Portrait of a Minnesota Community

By Aida Alami

Refugees often say that war feels like a wave of violence washing over them, leaving behind death and destruction. The feeling was no different for Katra Ali Hethar, who fled war-torn Somalia in 1991 with her nine small children.

Continue reading “Somali and American: Portrait of a Minnesota Community”

‘Because I love Somalia and because I love America’: Minnesota celebrates Somali Independence Day and Week

By Jim Walsh

Cheers erupted and hundreds of Somali flags cut through the humid Minnesota night, waving wildly as Walz read from his proclamation celebrating Somalia Independence Day and Week. Observed annually in Somalia on July 1, the date celebrates the unification of the Trust Territory of Somalia (the former Italian Somalia) and the State of Somalia (the former British Somaliland) on July 1, 1960, which formed the Somali Republic. 

Continue reading “‘Because I love Somalia and because I love America’: Minnesota celebrates Somali Independence Day and Week”