Tag: African diaspora in America

The truth about Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the United States

By Carlos Echeverria-Estrada and Jeanne Batalova|Migration Policy Institute

There were very few sub-Saharan Africans in the United States just a few decades ago, with under 150,000 residents in 1980. Since then, immigrants from some of the largest sub-Saharan countries, such as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Ghana, Somalia, and South Africa, have settled in the United States. Overall, more than 2 million immigrants have come from the 51 countries that comprise sub-Saharan Africa, making up 84 percent of the 2.4 million immigrants from the entire African continent. The remainder are from the six countries of North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia.

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Why Nigerians living abroad love to watch Nollywood movies

By Franoise Ugochukwu |Sierra Leone Times

The Nollywood industry – which came to life in the early 1990s – is often seen as a natural heir to the Nigerian TV series which had already produced roughly 14,000 feature films in the previous decade. These video-films of the early years have now become full feature films, and an integral part of popular life in Nigeria. Local audiences appreciate these homegrown productions relating to daily life in the country.

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Ugandans in America meet Parliamentary Speaker over rampant land grabs and tedious National ID process

 BY SARAH ACHEN KIBISI

Ugandans in diaspora, especially those in North America, have petitioned the Speaker of the Ugandan Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga, over rampant land grabbing, which they say has greatly affected their investments in their native country.

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How New Orleans celebrated Nigeria’s Independence Day

By C.C. Campbell-Rock

Nigerians, Nigerian-Americans, and African Americans gathered on the steps of New Orleans’ City Hall to commemorate Nigeria’s Independence Day and watch the Nigeria flag being hoisted and fly over the entrance of City Hall on October 4.

For more than 20 years, the Nigerian community in New Orleans has kept its African traditions alive, while forging alliances, in the tradition of an African village, among New Orleanians’ and others of African ancestry.

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Little Senegal: a home for West African food and culture in Harlem


Little Senegal is located just two blocks east of Morningside Park on West 116th Street.

BY NOAH SHEIDLOWER



Shop signs written in both English and French, men and women dressed in traditional boubou garments, chefs cooking up fish stew while chatting with customers in Wolof —this reminds one of Dakar, the capital of Senegal. Yet, Little Senegal brings this scene to NYC—just two blocks east of Morningside Park on West 116th Street.

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It’s now faster for immigrants to help their relatives become U.S. residents. Here’s how

Immigrants who obtain legal permanent resident status in the United States and those who, later, become naturalized U.S. citizens, often long for their close relatives — both abroad and inside the country — to follow their successful immigration journey.

There are several ways to help an eligible family member to immigrate to the U.S., but almost always this complex process begins with the submission of an essential form to establish the relationship between the applicant and the beneficiary.

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Bostwana-Born artist, Meleko Mokgosi, makes it big in America

The artist shows a series of works in all of Jack Shainman’s New York spaces that are simultaneously timeless and urgent.

By SIDDHARTHA MITTER

The Botswana-born painter, whose depictions of daily life in Southern Africa are underpinned by political history and critical theory, has exploded on the U.S. museum scene. He’s had recent solo shows at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, the Smart Museum in Chicago, and has another, beginning next February, at the Pérez Art Museum in Miami.

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The Misperception Of A People.

Most Nigerians are over-achievers in foreign lands and that should be highlighted much more than the bad apples that are spoiling the bunch. It is dangerous and anemic to the progress of all hardworking Nigerians by painting everyone with the same brush.

By Uju Obii-Obioha



Nigerians are a strong people with so much vibrancy and excitement about life. We are very driven, passionate, resilient and pretty much have a desire to achieve and enjoy life. As a result of the myriad of challenges we have had as a nation, the country’s economy has not been vibrant enough to sustain its nearly 200 million citizens and as a people that are driven we naturally migrate to other countries in search of greener pastures. After all, one of the primary reasons for immigration for people all over the world is the search for better economic opportunities.

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ADEBAYO OGUNLESI: The Nigerian-American Lawyer And Global Investment Banker

Adebayo O Ogunlesi born December 20, 1953 is a Nigerian lawyer and investment banker. Ogunlesi is currently Chairman and Managing Partner at the private equity firm Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP). Ogunlesi was the former head of Global Investment Banking at Credit Suisse First Boston before being promoted to Chief Client Officer and Executive Vice Chairman. Ogunlesi is from Makun, Sagamu, Ogun State in Nigeria.

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African Catholics converge for regional conference in Newark

By Juliet Njoku 

African Catholics from the Diocese of Camden and the Archdioceses of Philadelphia and Newark converged at the Blessed Sacrament Saint Charles Borromeo Parish, Newark, on Oct. 11-12, 2019. It was the first regional conference of the National Association of African Catholics in the United States (NAACUS) hosted by NAACUS Region 3, comprised of dioceses in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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Another view on the dismissal of the African Union Permanent Representative to the United States, Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao

By Ed. DUCHE

The African diaspora in the United States of America and around the world is riled up in controversy following the dismissal of the African Union Head of Mission to U.S.,  Ambassador Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao by the African Union Commission Chairman  Moussa Farki Mahamat.

A petition on the popular site ww.change.org  initiated by Professor Apollos Okwuchi Nwauwa Secretary of the African Diaspora Congress to “Reinstate African Union Ambassador Chihombori-Quao” on Sunday, October 20, 2019 has garnered approximatively 60,000 signatures in counting.

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African food truck diversifies food scene in West Campus in Austin, Texas

BY SARA JOHNSON

A new food truck opened last Wednesday behind the University Co-op, bringing the taste of African cuisine closer to campus.

African Delights offers a small, seasonal menu of West African cuisine and operates between 11:30 a.m. and 2:45 p.m., according to a sign on the front of the food truck.

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Outrage as African Union Fires Envoy in US

By Kudakwasahe Mugari

The dismissal of outspoken Zimbabwe-born African Union Ambassador to the United States, Dr Arikana Chihombori-Quao on Monday, has angered many Africans around the globe, prompting an online petition that had by last night attracted at least 15 000 signatures.

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The other African-Americans

The African-born migrant population is doubling every decade.


“I just came to hustle,” explains Gabriel, a recent migrant, as he wields an electric razor to sculpt an impressive structure from a teenage customer’s hair. During shifts at Afrikiko Hair & Fashion Boutique, in northern Chicago, he gets the chance to display a range of skills. Not least, his gift for languages: he speaks four, all from Ghana, besides English. Mostly he chatters in Twi, the most popular tongue in the west-African country.

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African migration to the United States is the fastest-rising—in spite of Trump

By Chidinma Irene Nwoye & Dan Kopf

Africa has the fastest-growing number of immigrants in the United States, according to a Quartz analysis of US Census Bureau data.

The number of African migrants grew at a rate of almost 50% from 2010 to 2018. This is more than double the growth rate of migration to the US from Asia, South America or the Caribbean.

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