Tag: African diaspora in America

Naijalife | New online Marketplace Allows African Diaspora to Get a Taste of Home

By MENAFN

Africans can now relish the taste of home even while being abroad. Naijalife Magazine USA has launched an online marketplace that allows customers to source commodities from home at market prices.

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African Consuls General hold dialogue with Diaspora leaders, U.S. officials

By Vanguard

A dialogue between African Consuls General in the United States and diaspora leaders on issues of common interest was held alongside some elected public officers of the host country through Zoom. The engagement was first of its kind and it came four months after the formation of the African Consuls General (ACG) forum in February.

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Friendly Minneapolis, why?

In the wake of George Floyd’s killing, a Nigerian Professor remembers his visits to Minneapolis, a city that is home to a large number of African immigrants.

By Victor Ariole | The Guardian

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African Diaspora and Disparities in Healthcare in the Age of COVID-19

By Grace A. Jibril | The Liberian Observer

What can we learn from the challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic is forcing us to face about ourselves both culturally and socioeconomically across either side of the Atlantic? A comparative look at disparities in local healthcare provision America offers a revealing perspective.

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COVID-19: African diaspora’s remittances to drop in 2020

By North Africa Post

The coronavirus pandemic and its economic consequences in host countries will have a negative impact on migrants’ money transfers to Africa, which are expected to fall sharply in 2020, according to World Bank experts.

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The truth about Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in the United States

By Carlos Echeverria-Estrada and Jeanne Batalova|Migration Policy Institute

There were very few sub-Saharan Africans in the United States just a few decades ago, with under 150,000 residents in 1980. Since then, immigrants from some of the largest sub-Saharan countries, such as Nigeria, Ethiopia, Ghana, Somalia, and South Africa, have settled in the United States. Overall, more than 2 million immigrants have come from the 51 countries that comprise sub-Saharan Africa, making up 84 percent of the 2.4 million immigrants from the entire African continent. The remainder are from the six countries of North Africa: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Sudan, and Tunisia.

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Why Nigerians living abroad love to watch Nollywood movies

By Franoise Ugochukwu |Sierra Leone Times

The Nollywood industry – which came to life in the early 1990s – is often seen as a natural heir to the Nigerian TV series which had already produced roughly 14,000 feature films in the previous decade. These video-films of the early years have now become full feature films, and an integral part of popular life in Nigeria. Local audiences appreciate these homegrown productions relating to daily life in the country.

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Ugandans in America meet Parliamentary Speaker over rampant land grabs and tedious National ID process

 BY SARAH ACHEN KIBISI

Ugandans in diaspora, especially those in North America, have petitioned the Speaker of the Ugandan Parliament, Rebecca Kadaga, over rampant land grabbing, which they say has greatly affected their investments in their native country.

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How New Orleans celebrated Nigeria’s Independence Day

By C.C. Campbell-Rock

Nigerians, Nigerian-Americans, and African Americans gathered on the steps of New Orleans’ City Hall to commemorate Nigeria’s Independence Day and watch the Nigeria flag being hoisted and fly over the entrance of City Hall on October 4.

For more than 20 years, the Nigerian community in New Orleans has kept its African traditions alive, while forging alliances, in the tradition of an African village, among New Orleanians’ and others of African ancestry.

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Little Senegal: a home for West African food and culture in Harlem


Little Senegal is located just two blocks east of Morningside Park on West 116th Street.

BY NOAH SHEIDLOWER



Shop signs written in both English and French, men and women dressed in traditional boubou garments, chefs cooking up fish stew while chatting with customers in Wolof —this reminds one of Dakar, the capital of Senegal. Yet, Little Senegal brings this scene to NYC—just two blocks east of Morningside Park on West 116th Street.

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