Tag: African immigrants

Why No One Is Discussing the Rise in Africans Migrants Piled at U.S.-Mexico Border

By David Love

The subject of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border conjures images of people from Latin America, particularly Central America, who are fleeing poverty and violence. However, the dynamics of migration into the U.S. are changing. Increasingly, many migrants crossing the border are from nations in Africa and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, making asylum seekers and the border a Black issue as well.

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Trump’s Incendiary Rhetoric Is Only Accelerating Immigration

  The Crisis at the Border Is of Washington’s Own Making

By Randy Capps

President Donald Trump’s stance on immigration could hardly be less welcoming. During the 2016 presidential campaign, he pledged to build a wall across the entire southern border, deport all undocumented immigrants, and restrict legal immigration—including instituting a “complete and total shutdown” of Muslims entering the United States. He has yet to deliver on the most draconian of these promises, but there’s no denying that his administration has made border security and immigration enforcement top priority

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U.S. dream pulls African migrants in record numbers across Latin America

Marilyne Tatang, 23, crossed nine borders in two months to reach Mexico from the West African nation of Cameroon, fleeing political violence after police torched her house, she said.

She plans to soon take a bus north for four days and then cross a tenth border, into the United States. She is not alone – a record number of fellow Africans are flying to South America and then traversing thousands of miles of highway and a treacherous tropical rainforest to reach the United States.

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Candace Owens sparks twitter storm following remarks about Nigerian-Americans

by  Nurudeen Lawal –

American conservative commentator and political activist Candace Owens is known for her pro-Trump activism and her criticism of the Democratic Party. In a tweet that is trending on Twitter, Owens claimed that Nigerian-Americans are the most successful ethnic group in the United States; more successful than blacks of over-privileged America.

She also asserted that the success achieved by Nigerians is because they are not exposed to the “Democrat parasite of victimhood!”

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‘We Are Americans’: Somali Refugee Family Reflects On Making A Life In The U.S.

By Josh Axelrod, Von Diaz, and Camila Kerwin

Facing persecution, violence, lack of health care and myriad other barriers to safety, millions of refugees leave home each year seeking a better life in a different country. As of 2017, more than 2 million Somalis have been displaced, in one of the world’s worst refugee crises, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

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Lazy people don’t immigrate; hopeful hard workers do


By Amgad Naguib

Earlier this year I was at my local gas station at 6 a.m. stocking up on caffeine for the daily commute. I joked with the young Ethiopian attendant about how haggard he looked and how happy he must be to get some rest after a graveyard shift.

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Somali and American: Portrait of a Minnesota Community

By Aida Alami

Refugees often say that war feels like a wave of violence washing over them, leaving behind death and destruction. The feeling was no different for Katra Ali Hethar, who fled war-torn Somalia in 1991 with her nine small children.

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America’s Asylum System Is Profoundly Broken

Until the United States establishes and articulates clear rules, the crisis at the border will continue.

By David Frum


A 25-year-old man from El Salvador tried to swim with his daughter across the Rio Grande to Brownsville, Texas. Father and daughter were caught in the current, and drowned. Their bodies washed ashore on the Mexican side of the river, in an image that has seized the attention of the world.

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‘Because I love Somalia and because I love America’: Minnesota celebrates Somali Independence Day and Week

By Jim Walsh

Cheers erupted and hundreds of Somali flags cut through the humid Minnesota night, waving wildly as Walz read from his proclamation celebrating Somalia Independence Day and Week. Observed annually in Somalia on July 1, the date celebrates the unification of the Trust Territory of Somalia (the former Italian Somalia) and the State of Somalia (the former British Somaliland) on July 1, 1960, which formed the Somali Republic. 

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When 100 Congolese Asylum Seekers Showed Up, This Shelter Made Room

A shelter in Buffalo, New York, operated by health center, Jericho Road, has been providing recent arrivals from the Democratic Republic of the Congo medical aid, legal services, and educational opportunities.

By Talya Meyers

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From Nigeria To Springfield, Missouri: Tayo Bakare Blooms Where Planted

By Michele Skalicky

Temitayo “Tayo” Bakare is 35-years-old with a family and a job as clinical director of pharmacy at CoxHealth in Springfield.  But her life began thousands of miles away in Africa.  She learned to be on her own at a time when many children in the United States are just beginning to test the waters of independence with their parents close by. She grew up in Nigeria and remembers a fun childhood there.

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From Somalia to Kenya, From Michigan to Missouri: Abdi Tarey Finds His Place as a New American

By Jessica Balise

In 1991, civil war broke out in Somalia. It’s a relatively young country, with only 59 years of independence since British rule. At the time, Abdi Tarey was five years old. His father was in the military and things became very dangerous for his family.

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Maine Needed New, Young Residents. African Migrants Began Arriving by the Dozens

By Kate Taylor

Through the winter, the families streamed into Portland, bringing stories of violence and persecution in their home countries in central Africa. Portland’s shelter for homeless families soon filled to capacity, so the city put mats on the floor of a Salvation Army gym for 80 more people. Then that, too, wasn’t enough. This month, 250 migrants from Africa arrived in this northeastern city of roughly 67,000 residents in the span of just a week, overflowing the overflow space and forcing Portland to hastily convert a basketball arena into an emergency shelter. Continue reading “Maine Needed New, Young Residents. African Migrants Began Arriving by the Dozens”

He traveled from Africa to Houston via Central America on plane, boat, bus and foot. There is no happy ending

By Rob Curran and Andrew Nelson

The last time we saw Eritrean asylum seeker Kidane Okubay, we were in a little port town on the border of Colombia and Panama and he was heading off into the night on a motorboat with 10 of his compatriots. We received emails from him on the road to the U.S., but they abruptly stopped in late August. What happened to him?

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Refugees and the spirit of America –

By Omar Kallon

Growing up as the son of a Sierra Leonean refugee in Egypt during the 1990s wasn’t easy. My father couldn’t return to his homeland because of a brutal civil war, and although my mother was an Egyptian citizen, Egypt’s patrilineal citizenship laws meant my father and my sister and I were never considered Egyptian.

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