Tag: African Students in America

Kenyan-born Stanford University student found dead at her university residence

  • Norah Chelagat Borus was found dead at her residence in Stanford University
  • Her death was confirmed by family spokesperson and Stanford University president

Norah Chelagat Borus, a Kenyan-born computer science student at Stanford University has been found dead at her residence at the university under unclear circumstances.

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Meet the 18-Year-Old Nigerian Going For a PhD program In New York University

BY SAHARA REPORTERS, NEW YORK

While a 15 year old Nigerian, Ekene Franklin, is being denied admission into university in Nigeria despite obtaining the highest score in the country’s university admissions exam, another Nigerian, Danial Obaji, has been awarded a fully funded scholarship to a doctorate program at the New York University.

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Minnesota Legislature elects Mike Kenyanya to university Board of Regents

Kenyan-American Mike Kenyanya, 22, was elected to a six-year term on the University of Minnesota Board of Regents

By Cynthia Simba

Newly elected regent Mike Kenyanya has a lot to look forward to. Upon completion of his bachelor’s degree, Kenyanya has been awarded one of Minnesota’s highest seats in public education.

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All-girls robotics team from Ghana wins World Robofest Championship in the U.S.

By Ismail Akwei

An all-girls robotics team from Ghana has won the senior division of the World Robofest Championship in the United States. They won the topmost position by beating teams from the United States, Mexico, Egypt, South Korea and dozens of others.

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Sudanese American Graduates With 5 Siblings in Attendance

Five siblings gathered in Storm Lake this weekend to watch their youngest brother graduate from high school, decades after their parents emigrated from war-torn Sudan to the United States.

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Escaped Chibok girl Palmatah Mutah graduates in United States

Palmatah Mutah, one of the 276 Chibok schoolgirls, abducted by terrorists in Northern Nigeria in 2014, has earned an associate degree from a community college in the United States of America.

Her graduation day came five years, one month and three days after the ignoble mass abductions that sparked global outrage and ignited the #Bringbackourgirls campaign.

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Kenyan students Bag UN Gold Award in US

Two students of Global Teacher of the Year 2019, Father Peter Tabichi, have followed in his footsteps by winning a competition in the US. 

By Dennis Mwangi


Esther Amimo Anyanzwa and Salome Njeri, both from Keriko Mixed Day Secondary School, Nakuru County, bagged the UN Sustainable Development Goal Award at the International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) on Thursday night in Phoenix Arizona.

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Nigerian-American earns 6.9 GPA to become first black valedictorian in school’s 125-year history

By Akinpelu Oluwafunmilayo

Nigerian-American Tobechukwu Tobi Phillips recently became the first Black valedictorian in Alvin High School’s 125 year history. She outdid herself by earning a 6.9 GPA on a 4.0 scale.

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‘My empowering journey to the United States of America’

From being bullied for not being able to speak English fluently to becoming one of the young Namibians with strong potential to positively impact the country, Anna Shilongo is today finishing her Master’s in Business Administration which is one more degree to add to the other three she already attained. 

Hard work, a love for reading, commitment, and overcoming insecurities, according to Anna, are only minor ingredients to her success.

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American students visit Africa via Motherland Connect

By Maya DuBois 

The non-profit organization Motherland Connect takes HBCU students to their African roots one country at a time.

The Motherland Connect started in South Africa and it operates on Florida A&M University’s campus via political science assistant professor Christopher Daniels. Continue reading “American students visit Africa via Motherland Connect”

Long journey for American International College runner from Kenya

By Garry Brown

Leakey Kipkosgei, who came to American International College from Kenya, has had quite a career as a long-distance runner on coach Leo Mayo’s track and field team.

As a junior in 2018, he placed third in the steeplechase at the NCAA Division II nationals, and made the All-America first team.

Prior to that, he received male track athlete of the year honors after winning the 1,500 and steeplechase in the Northeast-10 meet.

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Africa Salon festival in Yale University to celebrate arts and culture of the diaspora

By Adam Gaberapril

Africa Salon, Yale’s celebration of contemporary African arts and culture, returns to New Haven Friday-Saturday, April 12-13.

The fifth annual festival will bring poets, writers, filmmakers, comedians, and musical artists to Yale and New Haven to showcase the diversity of art and culture throughout the African diaspora.

According to the organizers, at a time when contemporary African art is drawing more eyes than ever, the salon invites audiences to rethink their conceptions of the continent and diaspora — to watch, listen, and respond — and to celebrate the creation and complexity of contemporary African narratives.  

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U.S. Urges Nigerian students to explore its Education Funding Program

Mathew Washburn, Programme Officer, Education USA Department of State, has urged Nigeria students to explore the department’s education Opportunity Funds Programme (OFP) to advance their studies in America.

Washburn spoke at the Foreign Press Centre International Reporting Tour of the U.S. Community Colleges and Workforce Development programme in Washington D.C.

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Recognizing differences can foster understanding

This week, TWESE, The Organization for African Students and Friends of Africa, in Rutgers university, is hosting a meeting entitled “Who Am I.”

A few days ago, my friend, a member of the TWESE e-board, posed the question: “What do you feel is the difference between people who were born and raised in our countries, people like us, and Black Americans?”

By Yvonne Olayemi


It is not news that Rutgers is divided into numerous sub-sects of social and ethnic groups. We are comprised of a student body from all over the world.

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Congolese KHS students share immigrant experiences at Truman

Immigrants who arrive in the United States on a diversity visa, randomly selected from among their county’s applicants, often come to the country the promise of a job and without being assigned a place to live, as refugees often are. With all of the U.S. to choose from, many recent immigrants from the Democratic Republic of Congo have chosen to make their home in Kirksville, Missouri.

Truman State University education students had a chance to hear the perspectives of students who are travelled a particularly long distance to Kirksville in an event at Violette Hall.

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