Tag: African Students in America

‘My empowering journey to the United States of America’

From being bullied for not being able to speak English fluently to becoming one of the young Namibians with strong potential to positively impact the country, Anna Shilongo is today finishing her Master’s in Business Administration which is one more degree to add to the other three she already attained. 

Hard work, a love for reading, commitment, and overcoming insecurities, according to Anna, are only minor ingredients to her success.

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American students visit Africa via Motherland Connect

By Maya DuBois 

The non-profit organization Motherland Connect takes HBCU students to their African roots one country at a time.

The Motherland Connect started in South Africa and it operates on Florida A&M University’s campus via political science assistant professor Christopher Daniels. Continue reading “American students visit Africa via Motherland Connect”

Long journey for American International College runner from Kenya

By Garry Brown

Leakey Kipkosgei, who came to American International College from Kenya, has had quite a career as a long-distance runner on coach Leo Mayo’s track and field team.

As a junior in 2018, he placed third in the steeplechase at the NCAA Division II nationals, and made the All-America first team.

Prior to that, he received male track athlete of the year honors after winning the 1,500 and steeplechase in the Northeast-10 meet.

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Africa Salon festival in Yale University to celebrate arts and culture of the diaspora

By Adam Gaberapril

Africa Salon, Yale’s celebration of contemporary African arts and culture, returns to New Haven Friday-Saturday, April 12-13.

The fifth annual festival will bring poets, writers, filmmakers, comedians, and musical artists to Yale and New Haven to showcase the diversity of art and culture throughout the African diaspora.

According to the organizers, at a time when contemporary African art is drawing more eyes than ever, the salon invites audiences to rethink their conceptions of the continent and diaspora — to watch, listen, and respond — and to celebrate the creation and complexity of contemporary African narratives.  

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U.S. Urges Nigerian students to explore its Education Funding Program

Mathew Washburn, Programme Officer, Education USA Department of State, has urged Nigeria students to explore the department’s education Opportunity Funds Programme (OFP) to advance their studies in America.

Washburn spoke at the Foreign Press Centre International Reporting Tour of the U.S. Community Colleges and Workforce Development programme in Washington D.C.

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Recognizing differences can foster understanding

This week, TWESE, The Organization for African Students and Friends of Africa, in Rutgers university, is hosting a meeting entitled “Who Am I.”

A few days ago, my friend, a member of the TWESE e-board, posed the question: “What do you feel is the difference between people who were born and raised in our countries, people like us, and Black Americans?”

By Yvonne Olayemi


It is not news that Rutgers is divided into numerous sub-sects of social and ethnic groups. We are comprised of a student body from all over the world.

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Congolese KHS students share immigrant experiences at Truman

Immigrants who arrive in the United States on a diversity visa, randomly selected from among their county’s applicants, often come to the country the promise of a job and without being assigned a place to live, as refugees often are. With all of the U.S. to choose from, many recent immigrants from the Democratic Republic of Congo have chosen to make their home in Kirksville, Missouri.

Truman State University education students had a chance to hear the perspectives of students who are travelled a particularly long distance to Kirksville in an event at Violette Hall.

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Nigeria has highest number of African Students In U.S

Nigeria has the highest number of students from Africa studying in the U.S.

Rachel Canty, Deputy Director, Students and Exchange Visitor Programme, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, who made this known at the Foreign Press Centre International Reporting Tour of the U.S. Community Colleges and Workforce Development programme in Washington D.C., said Nigeria has 16,039 students in the U.S.

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Celebrating Africa Culture at Eastern Kentucky University

By Samantha Tamplin

Traditional African dancers, drummers, poets and a panel of speakers performed at Eastern Kentucky University’s Africa Today event on March 22.

The event was hosted by the African Student Association (ASA) and was held in the O’Donnell auditorium in Whitlock.

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University of Georgia freshman starts business selling unique African products

  • Ramatulai Jagne, a first-generation college student from metro Atlanta, started Ramla Apparel, during her first year at UGA.
  • She saw a gap in the marketplace and dove in headfirst.
By Sara Freeland

Most University of Georgia students spend the first semester of their freshman yearadjusting to campus and studying for exams.

But after Ramatulai Jagne finished her homework, she worked on launching her business, Ramla Apparel.

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Africa Day at Univeristy of Virginia celebrates black pride and first-generation students

This year Africa Day focused on performances of empowerment
By Maya Das

When she arrived at the University, Uma Jalloh, current president of the University’s Organization of African Students, wanted to showcase her personal experience as a first-generation college student.

Her parents are immigrants from Guinea, but Jalloh was born in the U.S. After moving back to Guinea for a brief period of time, she returned to the United States and has lived in America since the age of six. She describes her experience of coming to America as a time of self-discovery and a chance to find her true identity, which blends both African and American culture.

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New African diaspora studies program starts at University of Oregon-Includes visit to Ghana

Bridging the gap between the African and African-American experience is the goal of a new study abroad program offered by University of Oregon’s Global Education Oregon program.

The program is partnering with two historically black colleges and universities on the study abroad experience. At least 15 students will be able to enroll in the program; the application deadline is March 15.

Students will begin by spending time in New Orleans. The city, which served as the first port of entry for many slaves coming to America, retains cultural and historical markers, many of which are still apparent today. Students will stay on the campus of Xavier University of Louisiana and visit landmarks and other important sites in the state.

From there, students will travel to Ghana, where they will live with host families while attending classes and excursions, including visits to historical points of interest related to the trans-Atlantic slave trade. At the conclusion of the program, the group will travel to Kumasi and to Cape Coast to visit one of the largest open-air markets in Africa and to see the castles used in the slave trade.

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Scholarship: Fulbright calls for applications from Nigerians in US

Applications have been called for the Fulbright Student Program available for Nigerian students. Two categories of grants are offered in the ARSP: research grants and program and curriculum development grants.

Funded by the U.S. Government, the Fulbright Programme aims at achieving mutual understanding through the academic and cultural exchange.

Fulbright scholarships will be awarded to applicants who demonstrate academic excellence, leadership qualities, and a commitment to improving cross-cultural relations through international exchange.

The program is open to several individual countries but the country announced in the report is for Nigerian students in the USA.

Get more details from source

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University of Maryland highlights diversity of African diaspora at Black Culture Expo

By Joy Saha

University of Maryland students hailing from as close as Baltimore and Washington D.C., and as far as Nigeria and Ghana, gathered in Stamp on Friday to acknowledge the contributions of various cultures of the black diaspora from Africa.

To celebrate Black History Month, the African Students’ Progressive Action Committee hosted the Black Cultural Expo to appreciate “the many different people that have connections to the African continent,” said the committee’s president Clydelle Agyei, a junior public health science major

“Our organization mainly focuses on African communities, but this time we wanted to broaden the spectrum,” said ASPAC co-vice president Karsten Dankyi, a junior neurobiology and physiology major.

“We wanted to do Africans, African Americans, Afro-Latinos. Just something that everyone could come and share and learn something in the process.The first half of the Expo featured five students showcasing their photography, painting, a cosmetic line and a clothing brand.

Isha Kamara, a junior theater major, displayed Iced Out Cosmetics, her personal cosmetic line that featured brightly colored lipsticks, collections of false eyelashes and a variety of bold facial glitters. For Kamara, her business is more than just makeup. It’s also meant to empower and represent both the black community and the queer community. Continue reading “University of Maryland highlights diversity of African diaspora at Black Culture Expo”

UC Berkeley needs to support African language programs

By Martha Saavedra and Leonardo Arriola

Every semester, UC Berkeley offers many new courses. The Amharic language course offered this spring is especially noteworthy. Except for a brief pilot program in 2006, this is the first semester students are able to take a course in Amharic, one of the languages of Ethiopia, which is spoken by nearly 26 million people worldwide. The course, which only opened for enrollment the week before the spring semester, was nearly full by the end of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, just before classes started.

Clearly, there was a pent-up demand for this language. Student motivations include plans for research, study, travel and work, as well as deepening cultural and familial connections. Amharic stands out as a new course at UC Berkeley with many motivated students.

Students studying African languages at UC Berkeley — currently, Arabic, Amharic, Chichewa and Swahili — are poised to participate in one of the most significant global developments unfolding in the 21st century: the increasing importance of Africa demographically, economically, socially and culturally.

Africa currently constitutes about 17 percent of the world’s population. It is the youngest continent in the world, and the youth population is only increasing. Significantly, this means that the world’s working age population will be largely African. Economically, overall growth rates on the continent are relatively high, with the International Monetary Fund reporting 3.76 percent real GDP growth. Ethiopia’s rate is an extraordinary 8.49 percent.

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