Tag: immigration issues

As economic growth languishes, state of Maine banks on immigrants

In northern New England, an aging population has hamstrung growth, but immigration could provide heft for the workforce.

By Alfonso Serrano


Born in Somalia, Abdullahi Ali grew up in a refugee camp in Kenya before arriving in Maine in the United States on a brisk day 10 years ago this month.

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Liberians allege racial animus behind Trump’s decision not to extend protection from deportation

By Brad Petrishen

The former top lawyer for the city of Philadelphia, with more than 70 Liberians sitting behind him Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Worcester, argued that racial animus was behind President Donald J. Trump’s decision to not extend a program that has allowed Liberian refugees to stay in America for decades.

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African migrants stuck in southern Mexico, their American dream on hold

By PATRICK J. MCDONNELL 

“Africa weeps. Free us.”

That’s the message handwritten in French and Spanish on a protest bannerat a tent city here in the southernmost tip of Mexico.

The tents belong to some 250 African nationals who crossed jungles, forded rivers, sneaked across borders and dodged militias and thieves to get here in hopes of eventually reaching the United States. But now they are stuck, because Mexico has denied them the travel visas necessary to proceed north.

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Taxi rides provide illumination about crisis of immigration

By Bill Decker

When I read or hear stories about the current immigration crisis on the U.S. southern border, the word “cacophony” frequently comes to mind: an “unpleasant mixture of loud sounds,” as one dictionary defines it.

The same dictionary then provides a list of synonyms: bedlam, clash, commotion, salvo, thunder, and uproar.

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For African migrants, will Panama become the new Libya?

By Laureen Fagan 

Another 200 migrants were rescued on the Mediterranean Sea on Wednesday, this time as they attempted to make the crossing from Morocco into Spain. These migrants from sub-Saharan countries, traveling in three boats, are the latest in the all-too-familiar story of Africans who travel through Libya and other nations, desperately seeking to reach Europe, even as the European Union crafts policies to prevent them from crossing the sea.

The same principle is at work along the southern border of the United States, where immigration policies and enforcement under President Donald Trump have become increasingly draconian.

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Congolese Asylum-Seeker Reunited With Family After Almost Two Years Apart

By Max Rivlin-Nadler

An asylum-seeker from the Democratic Republic of Congo was reunited with his family in San Diego on Sunday after almost two years in U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detention.

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Jackson State University students go to Ghana, gain understanding of ‘Sankofa’

By Donna Ditota

About three weeks ago, Bourama Sidibe and John Bol Ajak were driven to New York City by a Syracuse basketball team manager to secure a visa that would enable them to travel to Italy with their Orange teammates.

Sidibe, a native of the African nation of Mali, carries a 5-year student visa, which enables him to stay in the United States until its expiration date. But to travel anywhere outside the U.S., Sidibe needs to secure a visa. Ajak, who came to America by way of South Sudan and then Kenya, is governed by the immigration laws of South Sudan and his case apparently was complicated by his restrictive immigration status.

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Coming To America: The Best Student Podcasts About Immigration from NPR

By JACQUELINE NKHONJERA

When Fahmo Abdi and her family immigrated to the United States from Kenya, they lost contact with all of their loved ones. While living in a refugee camp, Abdi’s mother decided to move her family to the United States in search of a better life. “She knew she had to work hard to provide for us and [for] her family back home,” Abdi recalls.

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Kenyan doctor deported from the US seeks help to return

By Rene Otinga

A Kenyan doctor who was recently deported from the United States now needs help get back to the country. Alexander Ondari, jetted back to the US in a bid to complete his last year as a resident physician at the University of Texas on July 6 but was denied entry to the country.

His unfortunate predicament has prompted him to send an urgent plea to the US embassy in Nairobi to intervene on his behalf.

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Immigration And The African Diaspora

Dr. Halifu Osumare

With the Trump administration’s hardline and heartless immigration policies — starting with the 2017 rescinding of DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) for young immigrants already in the U.S. and continuing with the 2018 family separation policy under his so-called “zero-tolerance” approach at the U.S.-Mexico border — the focus has been on brown people escaping poverty, gang violence, and state terror in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador. But there are also tens of thousands of African, Caribbean, and African diasporans entering the country by plane that are also trapped in the morass of Trumpian hardline immigration policies.

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‘I do everything all Americans do.’ Home but for how long? ICE releases Mauritanian man after 11 months

Amadou Sow, 49, a Mauritanian national, stands in the doorway of his apartment in Lockland, where his family has lived for 13 years. Immigration and Customs Enforcement arrested him Aug. 22 but inexplicably released him July 12 after almost 11 months in detention. (Photo: Albert Cesare / The Enquirer)

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Am I an American?

President Trump’s tirade against four minority congresswomen prompts the question: Whom does he consider to be American?

By Ibram X. Kendi


I live in envy. I envy the people who know their nationality. All the people whose nationality has never been a question in their mind.

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Why No One Is Discussing the Rise in Africans Migrants Piled at U.S.-Mexico Border

By David Love

The subject of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border conjures images of people from Latin America, particularly Central America, who are fleeing poverty and violence. However, the dynamics of migration into the U.S. are changing. Increasingly, many migrants crossing the border are from nations in Africa and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, making asylum seekers and the border a Black issue as well.

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Trump’s Incendiary Rhetoric Is Only Accelerating Immigration

  The Crisis at the Border Is of Washington’s Own Making

By Randy Capps

President Donald Trump’s stance on immigration could hardly be less welcoming. During the 2016 presidential campaign, he pledged to build a wall across the entire southern border, deport all undocumented immigrants, and restrict legal immigration—including instituting a “complete and total shutdown” of Muslims entering the United States. He has yet to deliver on the most draconian of these promises, but there’s no denying that his administration has made border security and immigration enforcement top priority

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America’s Asylum System Is Profoundly Broken

Until the United States establishes and articulates clear rules, the crisis at the border will continue.

By David Frum


A 25-year-old man from El Salvador tried to swim with his daughter across the Rio Grande to Brownsville, Texas. Father and daughter were caught in the current, and drowned. Their bodies washed ashore on the Mexican side of the river, in an image that has seized the attention of the world.

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