Tag: African artists in America

Congolese refugee launches American art career with help from Refugee Assistance Partners of N.J.

By Brenna Holland | For NJ Advance Media

When Muyambo Marcel Chishimba was referred to the Refugee Assistance Partners of New Jersey (RAP), he expected to be helped in his effort to navigate the government, housing and school systems in his new home of Elizabeth. What Chishimba did not expect was that RAP would be the organization to help jump start his career as an artist in the United States.

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Kenyan-born artist appeals for support in tattoo magazine competition

By Kirsten Kanja |SDC.co.ke

Wakenya Clewis, a Kenyan-born art enthusiast has appealed for support in her bid to become the next cover girl for Ink Magazine, a lifestyle magazine covering tattoo culture. According to the ‘Kenyan Hippie’, getting on the magazine’s cover would achieve more than just showcasing her art.

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Artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby explores memory, Nigerian culture in work, visits Baylor

By CARL HOOVER choover@wacotrib.com

Los Angeles artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby explores the cultural collage of memory, particularly for those who straddle two or more cultures, on her canvases for good reason: It’s her story.

Akunyili Crosby, born in Enugu, Nigeria in 1983, came to America to study medicine only to find a different calling in art — a calling that has led to a host of international prizes, a MacArthur Fellowship and pieces that have sold for more than a million dollars.

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Bostwana-Born artist, Meleko Mokgosi, makes it big in America

The artist shows a series of works in all of Jack Shainman’s New York spaces that are simultaneously timeless and urgent.

By SIDDHARTHA MITTER

The Botswana-born painter, whose depictions of daily life in Southern Africa are underpinned by political history and critical theory, has exploded on the U.S. museum scene. He’s had recent solo shows at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, the Smart Museum in Chicago, and has another, beginning next February, at the Pérez Art Museum in Miami.

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Nigerian poet selected for International Writing Program at the University of Iowa

By Oladeinde Olawoyin

An award-winning Nigerian poet, essayist, translator and author of short stories, Tade Ipadeola, has been selected to participate in the International Writing Program (IWP) Fall Residency at the University of Iowa, courtesy of the United States Department of State.

From September 1 to November 16, Mr Ipadeola will join 28 other accomplished writers from across the globe in the world’s oldest and largest multinational writing residency.

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African Festival of the Arts Celebrates 30th Anniversary This Labor Day Weekend

By Angel Idowu

“Africa is here and it’s a good thing,” says Patrick Saingbey-Woodtor, founder of Chicago’s African Festival of the Arts, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this weekend in Washington Park.

The festival was initially created to bring attention to Saingbey-Woodtor’s Window to Africa shop and Hyde Park’s Harper Court. It has since grown into an annual weekend celebration that draws crowds from across the country with live music, fine art, food and more.

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Laolu Senbanjo: Broklyn based- Nigerian visual artist paints Serena Williams for the cover of Essence Magazine

Laolu Senbanjo is a brooklyn-based Nigerian body artist who has done so many works that speak for themselves. He painted fBeyoncé for her album, Lemonade. His latest work is with the American tennis super star, Serena Williams, on the cover of the September issue of Essence.

In the magazine’s cover, the tennis player rocks the daring body art of the Nigerian visual artist in a way that gives her a daring look.

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Kehinde Wiley’s Black Rock Senegal Residency Announced 16 Artists Selected for Inaugural Year

by VICTORIA L. VALENTINE

BLACK ROCK SENEGAL announced the first group of artists selected for the residency program established by Kehinde Wiley. Located in Dakar, Black Rock is hosting an international slate of 16 artists working in a variety of disciplines, including painting, sculpture, photography, film, and one writer, from August 2019 and April 2020. The news was released today by Stephen Friedman, Wiley’s London gallery.

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Hip-hop stars Akon and Enow join forces to promote power projects in Africa

By PK Semler

Aliaune “Akon” Thiam and Stanley Enow –the Senegalese-American and Cameroonian hip-hop stars – are joining forces to promote major African energy projects such as a 350 MW hydroelectric power plant in the strategically vital West-Central African nation of Cameroon.

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8 year old Nicholas Buamah is a bestselling author on Amazon and he was Ghana’s Ambassador to USA for a day

By Nathaniel Crabbe

Eight year old Ghanaian, Nicholas Buamah, author of the book ”Kayla & Kyle The Walking Dictionaries: Election Day”, paid a courtesy visit to Ghana’s Ambassador to the United States, His Excellency (H.E) Dr. Barfour Adjei Barwuah, which saw the budding author become an ambassador for a few minutes.

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Egyptian-born artist opens art gallery in America

By Ryan Kneller

For decades, Phillipsburg artist Mohamed Bayoumi Mansour followed in the footsteps of his older brother, Ali Bayoumi. Bayoumi, a professor of architecture and prominent Egyptian artist, inspired Mansour to nurture his creativity and pursue his own career in the arts.

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Ngugi Wa Thiong’o registers for Huduma Namba in Los Angeles

By Jeremiah Wakaya

As the Kenyan government commences registration of Kenyans in Diaspora, renowned Kenyan scholar Professor Ngugi wa Thiong’o has been registered at the Kenyan consulate in Los Angeles, USA.

Thiong’o was registered on  the National Integrated Identity Management System (NIIMS) together with his wife, Njeri wa Ngugi.

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He Fled Violence in Nigeria. Now He’s Trying to Make It as an Artist in Dallas

By Tyler Hicks

As night descends on the wooded hills surrounding his home, visual artist Jeremiah Onifadé gets to work. While his garage studio is his usual stomping grounds, tonight Onifadé is working in the kitchen of his two-story house in a middle-class neighborhood near Grand Prairie. A glass table facing a sliding glass door looks out on Onifadé’s backyard, and to a scattering of trees beyond.

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‘Call me American’ Portland resident who escaped war-torn Somalia shares story

Abdi Nor Iftin will discuss his new memoir, “Call Me American,” Tuesday, June 4, at 5:30 p.m. at the Southwest Harbor Public Library.

Iftin lives in Portland where he works as an interpreter for other Somalis in Maine. He was recently accepted to the University of Southern Maine, where he plans to study political science.

“Call Me American” is the true story of Iftin’s survival of in war-ravaged Mogadishu, Somalia, and his journey to America.

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In Language Rooms, an Egyptian American interrogator struggles to prove his loyalty to the U.S.A.

By Kerry Reid

Egyptian American playwright Yussef El Guindi is mostly known to Chicago audiences from several productions with Silk Road Rising, including the world premiere of his 2005 comedy Ten Acrobats in an Amazing Leap of Faith, about an Egyptian immigrant family wrestling with assimilation in America. 

Back of the Throat, in which an Arab American man in post-9/11 America faces down government agents who take over his home in an increasingly hostile “investigation,” followed a few months later.

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