Tag: African writers in America

James Magot| Lancaster City man commemorates 20th anniversary arriving in America from Sudan with children’s book about multi-cultural identity

By Jermaine Rowley | fox43

LANCASTER COUNTY, Pa. — An active leader in Lancaster refugee communities is taking a creative approach to inform children and their parents about multi-cultural identity. James Magot, 40, a former South-Sudanese “Lost Boy” refugee is developing his first children’s storybook with the help of illustrator Tess Feiler and a few other local collaborators in honor of his 20th anniversary of arriving in America.

Continue reading “James Magot| Lancaster City man commemorates 20th anniversary arriving in America from Sudan with children’s book about multi-cultural identity”

Maaza Mengiste | Ethiopian-American author says ‘My 20-year-old self never realised you could become a writer’

by Hester Lacey | Financial Times

Maaza Mengiste, 49, was shortlisted for this year’s Booker Prize for her novel The Shadow King, which draws on women’s experiences of the 1930s war between Ethiopia and Italy. She was born in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from where her family fled during the 1974-91 civil war, and she has subsequently lived in Nigeria, Kenya and the US. A professor of creative writing and literary translation at Queens College, New York, she is also the author of Beneath the Lion’s Gaze.

Continue reading “Maaza Mengiste | Ethiopian-American author says ‘My 20-year-old self never realised you could become a writer’”

Laila Lalami | For some Americans, having a US passport doesn’t mean you’re treated like a citizen

by Madeleine Brand | KCRW

“All the passports look the same, but not everybody looks the same to the border agents,” says author Laila Lalami, who was born in Morocco and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Continue reading “Laila Lalami | For some Americans, having a US passport doesn’t mean you’re treated like a citizen”

Maaza Mengiste | Her Booker shortlisted novel choreographs women’s footprints on the battlefield

By Aditi Sriram | Scrool.in

Ethiopian-American Maaza Mengiste’s second novel, The Shadow King, recounts a tumultuous war in Ethiopian history that took the country by surprise, pit locals against one another, and left them scarred for decades to come. Narrating the story is an invisible, omniscient chorus of women, inspired by Mengiste’s own great-grandmother. They alternate between singing, mourning, and rallying the troops into action, never allowing the reader a moment of silence. The result is a visceral story of violence, loyalty and forgiveness.

Continue reading “Maaza Mengiste | Her Booker shortlisted novel choreographs women’s footprints on the battlefield”

Ethiopia-American Maaza Mengiste and Zimbabwean Writer Tsitsi Dangarembga make Booker Prize short List

By JILL LAWLESS Associated Press | Greeneville Sun

Ethiopia-American Maaza Mengiste and Zimbabwean writer Tsitsi Dangarembga are among six finalists announced for the prestigious Booker Prize for fiction.

Continue reading “Ethiopia-American Maaza Mengiste and Zimbabwean Writer Tsitsi Dangarembga make Booker Prize short List”

Yaa Gyasi | Ghanaian-American author draws on her upbringing in new book ‘Transcendent Kingdom’

By TERRY GROSS | NPR

Author Yaa Gyasi’s family emigrated from Ghana to the United States when she was 2, but it wasn’t until she was 9 and her family moved to Huntsville, Ala., that she began to feel like she didn’t fit in.

Continue reading “Yaa Gyasi | Ghanaian-American author draws on her upbringing in new book ‘Transcendent Kingdom’”

Abdi Nor Iftin: A Somali immigrant hopes his book for young adults will inspire others to tell their story

By Victoria Zhuang | Boston Globe

As a young man fleeing violence and civil war in his native Somalia, Abdi Nor Iftin dreamed of a magnificent future in America. In 2014, after years of stateless limbo in Kenya, he won the Diversity Visa lottery, a program that offers a limited number of visas to applicants from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. His 2018 memoir “Call Me American” describes his experiences resettling in the United States.

Continue reading “Abdi Nor Iftin: A Somali immigrant hopes his book for young adults will inspire others to tell their story”

Namwali Serpell: Her first novel took fifteen years to write but this Zambian-born writer has won $175, 000 from two major awards one year later.

By Ebimo Amungo

It took Namwali Serpell fifteen years to complete her first novel, The Old Drift, but already the book has won two major awards worth $175, 000 only one year after its release in March, 2019.

Continue reading “Namwali Serpell: Her first novel took fifteen years to write but this Zambian-born writer has won $175, 000 from two major awards one year later.”

Tony K Ansah, Jr’s new book Chronicles Progress Revolving Around African Business Innovations

Tony K Ansah, Jr., M.P.A. is a self-published author and a social entrepreneur based in Rhode Island, U.S.A. He has written and published several books and content via poems, quotes, fiction, non-fiction, blogs, and articles. Tony has received national & international recognition for his articles about African business, culture, and philanthropy. He recently released a new book on his entrepreneurial journey and progress so far.

By Tony Kwame Ansah, Jr. | Modern Ghana

Continue reading “Tony K Ansah, Jr’s new book Chronicles Progress Revolving Around African Business Innovations”

For Her Debut, Abi Daré Confronts ‘Dreams and Intelligence That We Kill’

Writing “The Girl With the Louding Voice,” about a 14-year-old employed as a housemaid, challenged how the novelist viewed a common practice in her native Nigeria.

By Concepción de León | New York Times

Continue reading “For Her Debut, Abi Daré Confronts ‘Dreams and Intelligence That We Kill’”