Category: Book review

Laila Lalami | For some Americans, having a US passport doesn’t mean you’re treated like a citizen

by Madeleine Brand | KCRW

“All the passports look the same, but not everybody looks the same to the border agents,” says author Laila Lalami, who was born in Morocco and became a U.S. citizen in 2000.

Continue reading “Laila Lalami | For some Americans, having a US passport doesn’t mean you’re treated like a citizen”

Maaza Mengiste | Her Booker shortlisted novel choreographs women’s footprints on the battlefield

By Aditi Sriram | Scrool.in

Ethiopian-American Maaza Mengiste’s second novel, The Shadow King, recounts a tumultuous war in Ethiopian history that took the country by surprise, pit locals against one another, and left them scarred for decades to come. Narrating the story is an invisible, omniscient chorus of women, inspired by Mengiste’s own great-grandmother. They alternate between singing, mourning, and rallying the troops into action, never allowing the reader a moment of silence. The result is a visceral story of violence, loyalty and forgiveness.

Continue reading “Maaza Mengiste | Her Booker shortlisted novel choreographs women’s footprints on the battlefield”

Ilhan Omar’s book tells an inspiring story of her life but much Is missing

The Congresswoman, a Somali-origin Muslim, has fought many obstacles but has a long way to go in American politics.

By News Desk | Talmiz Ahmad

Continue reading “Ilhan Omar’s book tells an inspiring story of her life but much Is missing”

Emmanuel Kulu Brings a New Perspective to Ancient Egyptian History in His Novel “I, Black Pharoah Rise to Power”

By BlackNews

Buffalo, NY — Author/ African historian Emmanuel Kulu, Jr. has faced racism for his controversial novel, I, Black Pharaoh: Rise to Power. In early 2019, Kulu began his campaign restoring the true African origins of Ancient Egypt. Upon posting his book cover via social media, Kulu received massive amounts of death threats, racist comments, and hate emails regarding the cover.

Continue reading “Emmanuel Kulu Brings a New Perspective to Ancient Egyptian History in His Novel “I, Black Pharoah Rise to Power””

Somali-born Rep. Ilhan Omar describes a bruising life in new memoir

By Patrick Condon | Star Tribune

Rep. Ilhan Omar, whose unlikely rise from refugee to one of the first two Muslim women elected to the U.S. House, has written a memoir that comes out next week. From childhood onward, according to her new memoir, Rep. Ilhan Omar often seemed to find herself in the middle of nasty fights.

Continue reading “Somali-born Rep. Ilhan Omar describes a bruising life in new memoir”

Tony K Ansah, Jr’s new book Chronicles Progress Revolving Around African Business Innovations

Tony K Ansah, Jr., M.P.A. is a self-published author and a social entrepreneur based in Rhode Island, U.S.A. He has written and published several books and content via poems, quotes, fiction, non-fiction, blogs, and articles. Tony has received national & international recognition for his articles about African business, culture, and philanthropy. He recently released a new book on his entrepreneurial journey and progress so far.

By Tony Kwame Ansah, Jr. | Modern Ghana

Continue reading “Tony K Ansah, Jr’s new book Chronicles Progress Revolving Around African Business Innovations”

For Her Debut, Abi Daré Confronts ‘Dreams and Intelligence That We Kill’

Writing “The Girl With the Louding Voice,” about a 14-year-old employed as a housemaid, challenged how the novelist viewed a common practice in her native Nigeria.

By Concepción de León | New York Times

Continue reading “For Her Debut, Abi Daré Confronts ‘Dreams and Intelligence That We Kill’”

Here are the three new books you need to understand Nigeria

By Alex Thurston

Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa, radiating political, cultural and economic influence across the continent and around the world. Yet Nigeria’s incredible complexity — composed of hundreds of ethnic groups and languages — can be daunting even to those interested in understanding the country. The nonspecialist can also be easily misled by the popular image of Nigeria as a land of Internet scammers and, more recently, fanatical jihadists. Three recent books, however, make Nigeria more accessible to the beginner and more comprehensible to the specialist. These books take up core issues facing the country, especially the Boko Haram crisis and the future of Nigeria’s democracy.

Continue reading “Here are the three new books you need to understand Nigeria”

A Nigerian-American Bildungsroman, in Mormon Country Image

A PARTICULAR KIND OF BLACK MAN
By Tope Folarin

“Task: to be where I am. / Even when I’m in this solemn and absurd / role: I am still the place / where creation works on itself.”

This verse, from the Swedish poet Tomas Transtromer’s “Guard Duty,” provides the epigraph for Nigerian-American Tope Folarin’s debut novel, “A Particular Kind of Black Man,” and echoes of Transtromer’s lucidly self-instructive poem ring throughout its pages.

Continue reading “A Nigerian-American Bildungsroman, in Mormon Country Image”

Kenyan author and blogger, Janet Rangi, writes book on how immigrants can secure success in America

Hilary Kimuyu

In 2003 a go-getting Kenyan nurse called Janet Kisaka Rangi found out that an application process she had begun with some agents in Nairobi had borne fruit. She had an opportunity to move to the United States.

She quit her nursing job at Aga Khan University hospital after working for a year. She packed her belongings, left her husband behind and flew off to America, all this while expecting her first child.

Continue reading “Kenyan author and blogger, Janet Rangi, writes book on how immigrants can secure success in America”