Category: Religion

African Catholics converge for regional conference in Newark

By Juliet Njoku 

African Catholics from the Diocese of Camden and the Archdioceses of Philadelphia and Newark converged at the Blessed Sacrament Saint Charles Borromeo Parish, Newark, on Oct. 11-12, 2019. It was the first regional conference of the National Association of African Catholics in the United States (NAACUS) hosted by NAACUS Region 3, comprised of dioceses in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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Big Tent hosts African leaders’ pre-conference gathering

Leaders from 11 African countries now serving the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) in 22 states and 20 presbyteries across the United States gathered for the African Leaders Pre-Conference, sponsored by the Racial Equity & Women’s Intercultural Ministries at Big Tent 2019.

Those attending the African pre-conference at Big Tent in Baltimore joined in a Spirit-filled worship service Tuesday.

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African Priests Now Future Of Catholic Church In United States

By Afam Jude Offor

In more than a decade as a Catholic priest in the United States, Martins Emeh has served as a pastor, a cannon law instructor, a diocesan archivist and a judge on the church’s Ecclesiastical Court of Appeals.

Emeh, who came to the United States for graduate school in 1998 from Nigeria and was ordained thereafter, currently serves as a priest at the Epiphany of the Lord Catholic Community, a bustling church in suburban Houston.

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African Catholics celebrate their heritage of saints in Maryland

By Judith Mbuya

Millions of Catholics around the world faithfully recite the Nicene Creed at Mass every Sunday to profess their faith in God and the Trinity. That steadfast declaration is widely shared among Orthodox and many Protestants as a unifying tenet of Christian belief. But it’s a safe bet to say that most Catholics have never even heard of the saint who first wrote that creed.

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West African religions like Ifa and Vodou are on the rise in Maryland, as practitioners connect with roots

By Jonathan M. Pitts

They gathered in a clearing by a stream in Baltimore County one chilly early-spring day, some in the colorful African head ties known as geles, others wearing bracelets trimmed in shells or carved in wood.

One by one, they stepped forward to toss offerings into the Gwynns Falls – a pineapple, four oranges, a bouquet of tulips.

And when the lead priestess of these African-American women dropped a handful of shells to the ground and scrutinized their pattern, a message came through: Their celebration of the spring equinox was blessed by the divine.

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Nova Scotia’s Ethiopian church honouring victims of plane crash

The St. Gebriel Ethiopian Orthodox Church in Hammonds Plains will hold a memorial service on Saturday morning for the victims of the Ethiopian Airlines crash.

The jet went down on Sunday just after takeoff in Addis Ababa. None of the 157 passengers and crew, including 18 Canadians, survived the crash.

Rev. Les Zewdie, founder and spiritual leader of the church, said it is important to honour those who died.

“We take it personal because we are of Ethiopian descent but we are Canadian and then also we are Haligonian,” Zewdie said in a telephone interview on Friday.

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Week of Prayer: Reaching Africa through Minneapolis

By Brandon Elrod,

Philip Nache could have given in to despair. Boko Haram, the jihadist militant group located in Nigeria, had threatened his life, martyred a convert to Christianity and continued to intimidate Christians.

But despite the danger, Nache expected to return and serve the people he’d spent nearly 20 years ministering to, pastoring and planting churches among. He had come to the United States to attend Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, a moment of divine timing that coincided with Boko Haram’s first threats on his life.

As he contemplated whether and how to return to Nigeria, another divine appointment redirected his steps.

At that time, God opened the door for me to come to Minneapolis,” Nache said. “When I was told about the need here in the Twin Cities, I was still thinking of Africa, but after praying, I felt convicted to go to Minnesota.”

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