It’s now faster for immigrants to help their relatives become U.S. residents. Here’s how

Immigrants who obtain legal permanent resident status in the United States and those who, later, become naturalized U.S. citizens, often long for their close relatives — both abroad and inside the country — to follow their successful immigration journey.

There are several ways to help an eligible family member to immigrate to the U.S., but almost always this complex process begins with the submission of an essential form to establish the relationship between the applicant and the beneficiary.

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Bostwana-Born artist, Meleko Mokgosi, makes it big in America

The artist shows a series of works in all of Jack Shainman’s New York spaces that are simultaneously timeless and urgent.

By SIDDHARTHA MITTER

The Botswana-born painter, whose depictions of daily life in Southern Africa are underpinned by political history and critical theory, has exploded on the U.S. museum scene. He’s had recent solo shows at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, the Smart Museum in Chicago, and has another, beginning next February, at the Pérez Art Museum in Miami.

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The Misperception Of A People.

Most Nigerians are over-achievers in foreign lands and that should be highlighted much more than the bad apples that are spoiling the bunch. It is dangerous and anemic to the progress of all hardworking Nigerians by painting everyone with the same brush.

By Uju Obii-Obioha



Nigerians are a strong people with so much vibrancy and excitement about life. We are very driven, passionate, resilient and pretty much have a desire to achieve and enjoy life. As a result of the myriad of challenges we have had as a nation, the country’s economy has not been vibrant enough to sustain its nearly 200 million citizens and as a people that are driven we naturally migrate to other countries in search of greener pastures. After all, one of the primary reasons for immigration for people all over the world is the search for better economic opportunities.

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An Oscars ban for a Nigerian film shows the Academy still doesn’t get it on race

By Afua Hirsch

The penny about the US’s worldview dropped for me when I recently interviewed a highly educated, accomplished, politically and racially literate American. I mentioned something about the British empire and he looked at me blankly. “What is that exactly?” he asked.#OscarsSoWhite: a 10-point plan for change by the hashtag’s creator

Excluding Lionheart for using English shows Africans are still expected to satisfy American ideas of authenticity.

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Academy Disqualifies Nigeria’s Oscar Entry ‘Lionheart’

Nigeria’s first-ever submission in the Best International Feature Film category, is largely in English, which makes it ineligible to compete

By Steve Pond 


The Academy has disqualified Nigeria’s “Lionheart” from the Oscar race in the Best International Feature Film category, dropping the number of films competing for the award to 92 from what had been a record 93 entries.

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Ghanaian chemical scientist, Professor Kwasi Adomako Ohemeng, receives American Society’s highest honour

Professor Kwasi Adomako Ohemeng, the Dean of the School of Pharmacy, Central University, has been honoured by the American Chemical Society for his contributions to the development of industrial chemistry and for discoveries of medicines that impact the welfare of society.

He is among a team of 16 scientists from Paratek Pharmaceuticals whose work for the development of the FDA-approved antibiotic drugs Nuzyra (omadacycline) and Seysara (sarecycline) was recognised and adorned with the Heroes of Chemistry award.

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U.S. Treasury Calls Ethiopia, Egypt and World Bank to Nile Talks

By Nizar Manek

The U.S. Treasury invited Ethiopia and Egypt for talks, part of growing international efforts to quell a dispute over a giant dam that’s being built on the Nile River.

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin is convening the meeting in Washington, which the World Bank’s president will attend if the two African countries and mutual neighbor Sudan also participate, a spokesperson for the lender said Thursday. Ethiopia and Egypt’s foreign ministries have both said they’d accepted U.S. invitations for Nov. 6 talks.

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MARKS NAMED US AMBASSADOR TO SOUTH AFRICA

By Patrick Burgess

Controversial former Bermuda resident Lana Marks has been confirmed as the American ambassador to South Africa by the US Senate almost a year after President Donald Trump appointed her to the post.

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ADEBAYO OGUNLESI: The Nigerian-American Lawyer And Global Investment Banker

Adebayo O Ogunlesi born December 20, 1953 is a Nigerian lawyer and investment banker. Ogunlesi is currently Chairman and Managing Partner at the private equity firm Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP). Ogunlesi was the former head of Global Investment Banking at Credit Suisse First Boston before being promoted to Chief Client Officer and Executive Vice Chairman. Ogunlesi is from Makun, Sagamu, Ogun State in Nigeria.

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Calgary’s Nigerian community in shock over slaying of social worker

By ALANNA SMITH

Members of Calgary’s Nigerian community are in shock after a woman dedicated to helping the less fortunate was killed at a local care facility.

Deborah Onwu, a Nigerian immigrant who was a youth social worker employed by Wood’s Homes, was fatally stabbed Friday, allegedly at the hands of an 18-year-old she was caring for at an assisted living facility in the city’s southwest.

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Little Mogadishu on the Mississippi

Minnesota’s Somali Americans strive to free their community from violence

by Onize Ohikere 

The Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in downtown Minneapolis is nicknamed “Little Mogadishu” because of its Somali American population. On Somali Street, a mall rests inside a wide, blue bungalow. There, different vendors in stalls sell traditional clothes, food items, and duvets. 

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African Catholics converge for regional conference in Newark

By Juliet Njoku 

African Catholics from the Diocese of Camden and the Archdioceses of Philadelphia and Newark converged at the Blessed Sacrament Saint Charles Borromeo Parish, Newark, on Oct. 11-12, 2019. It was the first regional conference of the National Association of African Catholics in the United States (NAACUS) hosted by NAACUS Region 3, comprised of dioceses in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

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Brian Shimkovitz on his quest to find awesome African albums

By Bolaji Alonge

American music collector Brian Shimkovitz has a keen ear for music that could be easily lost in the bargain bin of history. Before realising his Awesome Tapes From Africa (ATFA) music blog and DJ project, Shimkovitz had gone to Ghana to study the hip hop scene in the country. He returned to the US with a host of audio cassettes that one could only find at African markets.

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Student who starred on Nigerian TV follows his passions at RIT

Dewé lives a double life with his interests of music and engineering

by Greg Livadas


Adesola Adedewe may be thousands of miles from his native Nigeria while attending Rochester Institute of Technology, but that doesn’t stop him from being recognized by other international students who watched him as a contestant on The Voice: Nigeria, which aired throughout the African continent in 2016.

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The Genre-Defying Singer with Ethiopian heritage is inspired by Japanese Funk

Berhana, the Atlanta musician behind 2016’s “Janet,” talks about incorporating diverse geographic influences in his debut album, HAN.

By HANNAH GIORGIS


When Berhana, the 27-year-old singer born Amain Berhane, finished his film program at the New School, he did what a lot of young artistic people in New York City do: He started working at a restaurant. During his time as a chef and assistant manager at Robataya, a now-defunct Japanese spot in the East Village, the recent graduate undertook a new, informal curriculum in Japanese culture; he was even tasked with learning to speak the language.

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