CNN Star Quit to Pen Book About Nigerian Schoolgirls Kidnapping: “I Didn’t Want to Do Any More Trump”

Isha Sesay left cable news to write about her time covering the 2014 abduction of 276 Chibok schoolgirls by the terrorist organization Boko Haram: “An ‘othering’ of Africa still exists in newsrooms.”

Isha Sesay became a TV news star in 2014, leading a CNN news team to a Peabody Award with her coverage of the kidnapping of 276 schoolgirls in Chibok, Nigeria, by the Boko Haram terrorist group.

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A “Go Back to Africa” media campaign uses AI to boost African American tourism

By Haleluya Hadero

“Go Back to Africa”, a racist putdown long used used against African-Americans, Africans, and other black people in North America and Europe has been getting a social media makeover.

Black & Abroad, an Atlanta-based lifestyle and travel company targeting black travelers, is reclaiming the derogatory statement with a new tourism campaign encouraging African-Americans to indeed go back to Africa.

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Meet Godshelter Oluwalogbon who Sells Jollof Rice Outside the Nigerian Consulate in New York

By Nina Roberts

Parked in front of Manhattan’s Nigerian consulate, during a blizzard or heat wave, is the intrepid Divine Flavored Food Truck selling home-cooked Nigerian food. Customers line up at the window to order jollof rice with goat, gizzdodo (chicken gizzard with plantain cooked in fresh thyme and curry), or a pureed red bean called moimoi, among other traditional Nigerian dishes.

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How bonds aimed at the diaspora can raise crucial funds for Africa

By Jay Benson

Nigeria’s first diaspora bond, issued in 2017, was a resounding success. It raised $300 million for investment in infrastructure from Nigerians overseas and was oversubscribed by 130%. The government is now reportedly planning a second similar offering.

As many African countries attempt to raise development finance, diaspora bonds – which resemble other kinds of bonds but are targeted at citizens abroad – are highly appealing.

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Jerry Mpufane Joins South African Tourism North America as President

By Janeen Christoff

Well-known South African marketing and advertising executive, Jerry Mpufane has been appointed as the new president for South African Tourism North America.

Mpufane will be based at the organization’s New York office and will lead a dynamic team responsible for driving growth into South Africa from the USA and Canada.

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Africa’s first black ‘Afronaut’, Mandla Maseko, dies in road accident before maiden mission

Mandla Maseko, a South African man who had won the opportunity to become the first black African to go into space, has died in a motorcycle crash. He was 30.

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‘The new diaspora is riding on the sacrifices of the old diaspora,’ and other takeaways from a black leaders roundtable

By Valerie Russ

It was the evening before Independence Day, and about 40 black people whose families had come from around the globe gathered at S.A. Cafe in Upper Darby to talk about an independence of their own.

This was the first Diaspora Leaders Roundtable, sponsored by FunTimes magazine publisher Eric Nzeribe, for people of African descent — African-Americans, African immigrants, and African-Caribbeans — to talk about bridging cultural divides and building a future together.

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Finger-lickin’ Ethiopian food at Queen of Sheba, New York

By Gabe Herman

Queen of Sheba has been serving Ethiopian food in Hell’s Kitchen for nearly two decades, and is still going strong with a wide array of tasty dishes from owner and chef Philipos Mengistu.

Before Mengistu moved to America in 1990 with dreams of opening an Ethiopian restaurant in New York City, he learned the craft in a restaurant that his parents ran in Addis Ababa.

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Dillon shop brings Africa to Montana

By Annie Pentilla

African Oasis, an upscale curio shop and coffee and tea house in downtown Dillon, is a site that isn’t hard to miss. In the small ranching and agricultural community, the Idaho Street store certainly stands out, laden as it is with African art and the taxidermy busts of animals from the continent where human life is said to have its origins..

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America pledges an ‘unwavering’ commitment to higher education in Africa

By Edwin Naidu

Senior United States diplomat Tibor Nagy, assistant secretary of state for African affairs, said his country is committed to strengthening ties on the African continent through stronger trade links and investment in higher education.

Nagy, the former vice-provost for international affairs at Texas Tech University in the US, spoke glowingly of the “enduring partnership between the United States and South Africa”.

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Economic ‘Game Changer’? African Leaders Launch Free-Trade Zone

By Boureima Balima

African leaders launched a continental free-trade zone on Sunday that if successful would unite 1.3 billion people, create a $3.4 trillion economic bloc and usher in a new era of development.

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Ethiopian culture celebrated at 10th annual festival in Burnaby

By Steve Saunders

It was a feast for the eyes and mouth as a Burnaby stadium was given some Ethiopian flair.Hundreds of people celebrated at the annual Ethiopian Summer Festival at Swangard Stadium Saturday.

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Is This 19-Year-Old the Next Great Kenyan Runner?

Rhonex Kipruto has ran the fastest 10km on American soil and wowed his coaches and competitors. So what makes him stand out in a country ripe with running talent?

By Adharanand Finn


Identifying the next big running star in Kenya, from the country’s incredible wealth of raw, hungry talent, is no easy thing. But for coach Ian Kiprono, a then 15-year-old Rhonex Kipruto stood out even as a scrawny, barefoot kid in a cross-country race a few years ago.

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Royal Air Maroc connects new England to Africa

By Iuliia Tore

Massport and Royal Air Maroc officials celebrated a new international service to Casablanca, Morocco, the first nonstop route from Boston Logan International Airport to mainland Africa. Boston is Royal Air Maroc’s fourth destination in the United States.

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Mandela Washington Fellows make stop in Williamsburg, learn from local leaders


By SaraRose Martin

A group of 25 young Africans with passions for journalism, human rights, law, gender equality, peace and nonprofit work stayed in Williamsburg the past two weeks for an exchange of ideas on civic leadership.

They are part of the Mandela Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders. The program that started in 2014 invites 700 leaders, ages 25-35 from 49 Sub-Saharan African countries to the United States each year.

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