Tag: Americans in Africa

U.S. military may join Mozambique cyclone rescue, aid agencies told

U.S. military teams could join the cyclone rescue effort in Mozambique, a representative of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) said, according to the minutes of a humanitarian meeting published on Thursday.

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US Embassy in Nigeria gives verdict on 2019 elections

The US Embassy in Nigeria has expressed disappointment in the quality of the 2019 elections in Nigeria.

The US Embassy said in a statement on Thursday that low turnout of voters, voter intimidation, interference by security forces, vote buying and violence reportedly marred the conduct of the elections in some locations.

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Meet Ghana’s first African-American Tourism ambassador, Diallo Sumbry

By Michael Klugey
Diallo Sumbry, the founder of the Washington D.C. based The Adinkra Group, an African Cultural Edutainment Resource, and Consulting Company, and organizer of the Back2Africa Festival and Tour has been appointed as Ghana’s first African-American Tourism Ambassador by the Ghana Ministry of Tourism, Arts and Culture.

Mr. Sumbry will join Ghana Tourism Ambassadors including Afrobeats Star Fuse ODG, Ghanaian Rap Star, Sarkodie, Ghanaian British Singing Sensations, Reggie N Bollie, and Singer Wiyaala to transform and promote tourism as a leading sector of the economy in Ghana.

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Google apologises for Ghanaian cedi mistake

Google has apologised to Ghana’s finance ministry and central bank for displaying a wrong exchange rate for the Ghanaian currency, the cedi, on its currency converter.

On Friday, Google’s currency converter said it took 22 cedis to buy one US dollar, when the correct rate was four times less.

Google said in a letter to the ministry and bank that the error occurred because of a “minor glitch” but was “quickly fixed”.

Nigeria also suffered a similar fate last month.

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AFRICOM Commander engages with African leaders in Washington

The top U.S. commander in Africa met with African leaders in Washington D.C. recently to discuss U.S. Africa Command’s role in the new National Defense Strategy and the value of partner capacity.

Marine Corps Gen. Thomas D. Waldhauser engaged with 21 defense attachés and the African Union Ambassador to the U.S. in a wide-ranging discussion at the Africa House, addressing various strategies and common challenges on the continent, Africa Command said.

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Nigerian-American Student donates classrooms to father’s alma mater

Nigeria-American, Uyi Omorogbe, a 21-year-old Senior Economics Major at Colgate University has two driving passions – To bring African fashion to the world and improve educational facilities in Africa.

He started a fashion brand NaSo and a Kickstarter campaign to promote both dreams.

His campaign must have succeeded because Uyi Omorogbe has just donted four classroom blocks that were equipped with facilities and furniture to Okosa Primary School in Urhokhosa, Uhunmwode Local Government area of Edo State, a school his Nigerian father attended as a child.

Uyi Omorogbe has shown that Africans in America always remember their ancestry.

Burger King restaurants keep losing money in South Africa – but a whole lot more are due to open anyway

By Phillip de Wet , Business Insider SA

Burger King outlets are losing it an increasing amount of money, the chain’s South African parent company Grand Parade Investments (GPI) said on Monday morning – but it is not backing down on plans to roll out a lot more of them.

A month ago GPI announced that it will liquidate Dunkin Donuts and the American ice cream brand Baskin Robbins in South Africa, after it could not make them profitable nor find a buyer interested in taking them over.

But things will be very different with Burger King. In interim results for the last half of 2018, GPI said it will roll out 15 new Burger King outlets every year for the next three years, which will increase its footprint by exactly half, to 135 stores.

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Feds Investigate Oregon Company’s African Rainforest Hardwood Products

By and
Roseburg Forest Products, one of the country’s leading manufacturers of particleboard and plywood, has ended production and sales of certain lumber products in the midst of a federal investigation into whether the wood came from the illegal logging of African rainforests.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement confirmed to OPB that its Homeland Security Investigations division has an ongoing investigation into illegal imports of okoumé, a wood used for plywood and veneer siding. The Lacey Act prohibits the trade of plants and wildlife taken, stored or transported illegally.

Okoumé hardwood trees grow in the rainforests of west-central Africa, where the deforestation of habitat for endangered species is drawing the concern of conservationists and scientists alike. Okoumé is used in some of Roseburg’s Real Wood Siding products, which are sold by major retailers including Home Depot and marketed as “environmentally friendly.”

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US Ambassador to Ghana Opens Shea Butter Processing Facility for Women

The United States Ambassador to Ghana, Stephanie S. Sullivan, Thursday, inaugurated a shea butter processing facility that would better the economic opportunities for some 600 women who collect and process shea nuts.

The United States Government, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), supported the construction of the facility and warehouse located in Gizaa-Gunda, in the Northern Region.

Shea is a primary source of livelihood for women in northern Ghana, and is one of the few agricultural crops where women control the revenue.

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ANCESTRY.COM releases new data for African diaspora to unearth their lineage

By Samara Lynn

Genealogical website Ancestry.com, has released 94 new and updated communities so that African Americans and Afro-Caribbeans can learn more about their roots.

Communities are part of the AncestryDNA test, which lets people from the African diaspora explore their heritage and how their ancestors migrated.

One of the new communities focuses on Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina African Americans. As per Ancestry:

“Members with this community may have ancestors that were enslaved and working on rice plantations in South Carolina and Georgia. When cotton fields came to the area in the late 1700s, many enslaved African Americans were brought to work those fields. Following the Civil War, the Great Depression, and World War II, many South Carolinians followed rail lines up North to New York and Philadelphia. This group was one of many communities that were part of the Great Migration–which was the movement of millions of African Americans during the 1900s from the South to cities in the North and West.”

Another new AncestryDNA community centers on Louisiana Creoles and African Americans. Interestingly, Ancestry’s research finds that by 1940 more than 18% of African Americans in the Bay Area were from Louisiana.

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I splurged on an 8-day, $3,000 trip to Nigeria for myself, and it was worth every penny

Sometimes, the best recipient of a holiday spending splurge is yourself. Here, author Adrienne Jordan details how she spent $2,881 on an eight-day trip to Nigeria. It was Jordan’s first time away from her family over the holidays, but she says the experience was “more than worth it” as detailed in this report in Pulse

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