Day: July 17, 2019

Dentist who escaped violence in Nigeria now a University of Manitoba success story

By Alison Mayes

Every immigrant comes to Canada with visions of achieving success and stability, says Dr. Ehiedu Osemiha, who left Nigeria with his wife and son in 2014. But for Osemiha, a dentist in the Nigerian Air Force who narrowly escaped a terrorist attack, the dream of qualifying as a dentist in Canada seemed almost too elusive to hope for.

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Am I an American?

President Trump’s tirade against four minority congresswomen prompts the question: Whom does he consider to be American?

By Ibram X. Kendi


I live in envy. I envy the people who know their nationality. All the people whose nationality has never been a question in their mind.

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Coptic Festival celebrates Egyptian culture in Canada

Egypt’s Ambassador to Canada Ahmed Abu Zied has praised the Egyptian Coptic Festival taking place in the Canadian city of Mississauga. 

The Egyptian Coptic Festival is a cultural event that celebrates Egyptian culture, history and arts in the public square for the purpose of creating awareness about Coptic Canadians, their heritage and role in society. 

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Somali-Americans in Minnesota mourn death of ‘inspirational’ Somali journalist

By Ibrahim Hirsi

One day, Hodan Nalayeh would be pounding the pavement in the Twin Cities, striking up conversations with Somali-Americans at their businesses — with her camera rolling and her face beaming. 

The next day, she would be in remote Somali villages, laughing with nomads herding camels and goats — and inviting them to speak into her microphone for a chance to tell their stories.  

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Why No One Is Discussing the Rise in Africans Migrants Piled at U.S.-Mexico Border

By David Love

The subject of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border conjures images of people from Latin America, particularly Central America, who are fleeing poverty and violence. However, the dynamics of migration into the U.S. are changing. Increasingly, many migrants crossing the border are from nations in Africa and the Caribbean, particularly Haiti, making asylum seekers and the border a Black issue as well.

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Trump’s Incendiary Rhetoric Is Only Accelerating Immigration

  The Crisis at the Border Is of Washington’s Own Making

By Randy Capps

President Donald Trump’s stance on immigration could hardly be less welcoming. During the 2016 presidential campaign, he pledged to build a wall across the entire southern border, deport all undocumented immigrants, and restrict legal immigration—including instituting a “complete and total shutdown” of Muslims entering the United States. He has yet to deliver on the most draconian of these promises, but there’s no denying that his administration has made border security and immigration enforcement top priority

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Ko-Thi African Dancers Honor the Past, Prepare for the Future

By John Schneider

In 1969, just into her 20s, Ferne Yangyeitie Caulker won the opportunity to study with the National Dance Company of Ghana, West Africa. A native of Sierra Leone already living and studying modern dance in Milwaukee (“It’s a long story,” she says), she’d set her sights on dancing with the famed Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre in New York City. She’d even received an encouraging letter from Ailey. Then, in Ghana, she visited Elmina Castle, the most famous of the fortresses along the Ghana coast used by Americans and Europeans as holding pens for captured Africans.

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Kenyan author and blogger, Janet Rangi, writes book on how immigrants can secure success in America

Hilary Kimuyu

In 2003 a go-getting Kenyan nurse called Janet Kisaka Rangi found out that an application process she had begun with some agents in Nairobi had borne fruit. She had an opportunity to move to the United States.

She quit her nursing job at Aga Khan University hospital after working for a year. She packed her belongings, left her husband behind and flew off to America, all this while expecting her first child.

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