Day: March 11, 2019

Ethiopian Airline Crash: Nigerian-Canadian Professor, Kenyan Georgetown University Student, among dead

Grief and sorrow know no borders, but Sunday’s Ethiopian Airline crash is truly an international tragedy.

The Nairobi, Kenya-bound plane went down within minutes of taking off from Addis Ababa.

The crash killed 157 people, seven of them crew members and one a security official, an airline spokeswoman said.

The passengers were from 35 nations, the airline said, with the greatest share from Kenya.

Among the victims was Cedric Asiavugwa, a third-year law student at Georgetown University and Nigerian-born Canadian, Professor Pius Adesanmi, the director of Carleton University’s Institute of African Studies.

Continue reading “Ethiopian Airline Crash: Nigerian-Canadian Professor, Kenyan Georgetown University Student, among dead”

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Tiffany Haddish, Nomzamo Mbatha, V. Bozeman spotted at Koshie Mills’ “The Diaspora Dialogues”

Eritrian-Americans Tiffany Haddish was the star of the black carpet at the Koshie Mills presents “The Diaspora Dialogues” on Saturday afternoon (March 9) at the Marriott Hotel in Marina del Rey, Calif.

The 39-year-old Girls Trip actress looked pretty in a burgundy, velvet jumpsuit as she stepped out for the event.

The Diaspora Dialogues is a platform and a movement created by Koshie Mills designed to break down barriers, bridge the gap between Africans from Africa and the descendants outside of the continent in the Diaspora.

This year’s International Women Of Power event had a myriad of powerful influential women from Africa, West Indies, UK and America.

Continue reading “Tiffany Haddish, Nomzamo Mbatha, V. Bozeman spotted at Koshie Mills’ “The Diaspora Dialogues””

Americans taught African churches that being gay is a sin, they listened

The United Methodist Church, like the Anglican, Episcopal, Evangelical Lutheran and Presbyterian churches, proselytized Africans and taught them Christianity. For hundreds of years, these Christians taught them that women were not equal, that slavery was permitted and that being gay was a sin. Today in Africa, even as women’s rights are being expanded, members of the LGBTQ community face harsh treatment.

Here in the United States, all these churches, except one, have stopped teaching that slavery is permitted by the Bible, that women are inferior to men and that being gay is a sin.

That one is the United Methodist Church, which recently refused to remove language from its discipline that being LGBTQ is “incompatible with Christian teaching.” It has stopped denying women equal rights, and has stopped claiming that slavery is permitted.

Continue reading “Americans taught African churches that being gay is a sin, they listened”

Her ancestors were enslaved in the U.S. Now a Trump decision could lead to her deportation to Africa.

Former American slaves were moved to Liberia in the 1800s to solve the “problem” of black and white people living alongside each other. Their descendants are facing the same journey.

Afomu Kelley was just 11 years old when she left Liberia with her mother in the early days of a civil war in 1990. She remembers standing in a crowd jostling to board an airplane to the United States for what she thought would be a six-week vacation.

Instead, the war in Liberia escalated and Kelley, now 40, never returned to the West African country. She grew up in Northern Virginia, where she finished high school early, and attended the University of Maryland. She has an American accent. Sometimes she doesn

But at the end of this month, she may be forced to return to a homeland she barely remembers.

On March 31, the program that has allowed Kelley and more than 800 other Liberian immigrants to live legally in the United States for decades will end, the result of President Trump’s decision to terminate a protection against deportation that has been in place for nearly 28 years.

Continue reading “Her ancestors were enslaved in the U.S. Now a Trump decision could lead to her deportation to Africa.”