Day: February 28, 2019

Senegal’s President Macky Sall wins second term

Senegalese President Macky Sall easily won a second term without the need for a runoff, election officials announced Thursday in the West African country.

The four opposition candidates said they would not pursue a legal challenge, ending days of uncertainty in this democracy long known for its peaceful transfers of power. Earlier in the week the opposition had denied unofficial reports that Sall won an outright majority, and they told their supporters to prepare for a second round.

The joint statement released Thursday afternoon by the opposition said that while they firmly rejected the outcome, “we will not be taking any recourse at the constitutional council.”

The incumbent leader received 58.3 percent of the vote, according to Judge Demba Kandji, president of the commission tasked with releasing the election results. Provisional results show that top opposition candidate Idrissa Seck took 20.5 percent of the vote while Ousmane Sonko had 15.7 percent.

Continue reading “Senegal’s President Macky Sall wins second term”

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Africa’s richest man makes a $17 billion bid for immortality

By Tom Metcalf and Devon Pendleton

The best way to appreciate the scale of Aliko Dangote’s empire is to hitch a ride on one of his private jets. A half-hour after his Bombardier Challenger 605 takes off from Lagos Airport, it descends into a seemingly desolate area of Kogi State in central Nigeria, dusty fields and clusters of trees stretching to the horizon. Suddenly a tangle of exhaust stacks, silos, and kilns pierces the sky to the left of the aircraft as Dangote Cement Plc’s Obajana plant comes into view. It’s already the biggest in Africa, churning out enough sacks of cement to fill 1,000 trucks a day. A fifth production line now under construction will make it one of the world’s largest.

The cement plant and its two sister factories in Nigeria have long been the bedrock of Dangote’s fortune, Africa’s biggest. But Dangote’s future—and, as he likes to say, that of the entire continent’s economy—lies to the south on the Nigerian coast. About 40 miles east of Lagos, on more than 6,700 acres of former swampland bound by a lagoon and the Atlantic Ocean, contractors are putting the finishing touches on a fertilizer plant valued at $5 billion. Next to it, construction of a vast oil refinery—a $12 billion project—is under way.

If all goes according to plan, the complex will immortalize the 61-year-old Nigerian businessman as Africa’s most prominent industrialist, vaulting Dangote Industries’ annual revenue from $4 billion to about $30 billion, roughly 8 percent of Nigeria’s gross domestic product. Oil industry experts such as London-based CITAC have questioned the project’s timeline, citing logistical and financial challenges. But Dangote insists the refinery, which will be Africa’s largest, is on track.

“By 2020 I will finally dispatch oil,” he says during a January interview at his Lagos home. Continue reading “Africa’s richest man makes a $17 billion bid for immortality”

America needs to vote more like Senegal

By Serena Piervincenzi,

There are so many things that I miss about Senegal. I miss waking up every morning to the sounds of goats, I miss being called by my Senegalese name, Ayisha,  I miss my adopted family, but more than anything, and perhaps most surprisingly, I miss the political attitude of Senegal as a country.

Senegal is a small country in West Africa, neighboring Mali and Gambia. They gained their independence from France, peacefully, on April 4, 1960. Since then, Senegal has remained one of the most successful, West- African countries. They function as a democracy, not unlike ours and, like us, some of their most important accomplishments have been spearheaded by their youth.

Prior to Senegal’s February 2012 presidential election, Abdoulaye Wade announced his plan to run for a constitutionally questionable third term. This did not sit well with many Senegalese people who believed that instating a third term for Wade would bring them closer to the kind of authoritarian rule that the current Senegalese constitution prohibits. Wade’s candidacy led to protests, organized and attended primarily by youth.

Several of these protests led to deadly encounters between protesters and police.

After losing the election to the opposition candidate Macky Sall, Wade quickly accepted defeat, and Senegal had yet another peaceful transfer of power. Continue reading “America needs to vote more like Senegal”

Somali native gives up American life for military service in his birth nation

It surfaced during his childhood in a typical American suburb setting replete with friends, video games and extracurricular sports.

It lingered in high school with a growing comprehension of his good fortune and a burgeoning understanding of world affairs.

It persisted as he entrenched himself in study at the University of Southern Maine and further gained a sense of what would give life purpose in his adult years.

African-born Mohamed Yusuf Mohamed had nurtured constant suppositions about his fate had his family not immigrated to this country from war-torn Somalia in 1990.

Continue reading “Somali native gives up American life for military service in his birth nation”

Comedian Kevin Hart Reaches Out To Young Nigerian Artist Who Drew Him

American comedian and actor, Kevin Hart has reached out to a young Nigerian artist who posted a drawing of him on Twitter.

The power of social media yeah?

The Kaduna-based artist, Eli Waduba Yusuf had posted the drawing two days ago, February 25, 2019, and asked users to retweet till it gets to Hart and it did.

Yusuf wrote that he is a hyperrealism pencil artist and will like to become like Arinze Egbengwu who is best known for creating hyperrealistic pencil drawings.

He wrote, on Twitter:

“My name is Eli Waduba Yusuf Am a Nigerian, based in Kaduna. Am a hyperrealism PENCIL Artist, I hope to become like . Please Retweet, let see it, thank you.”

Hart replied saying he has seen and will like to support him by paying him to do a pencil of three of his celebrity friends.

“I see it and I want to purchase it…I also want to support you and your amazing talent by giving you a fee to do a pencil drawing of 3 of my celebrity friends that I can gift it to. DM your info and let’s get to work!”

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