Day: November 26, 2018

Gambian-born Howard University Professor Sulayman Sheih Nyang

By Dr. Tijan M. Sallah

The news of the passing away of Professor Sulayman Sheih Nyang at the United Medical Center in Washington, DC, on Monday, November 12, 2018 came to me as a stab in the back. It was sad, disconcerting and painfully unbearable.

Professor Nyang was more than a friend to me; he often told me he was the only child of his mother and therefore considered me his blood brother and I felt the same way towards him. Although he had other half-sisters and brothers (one of the closest to him being Baboucarr Nyang, better known by his nickname, Papa Litty), Dr. Nyang was a generous man who had a large circle of friends and admirers, who were his ‘honorary’ relatives. Continue reading “Gambian-born Howard University Professor Sulayman Sheih Nyang”

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From Ghana to Canada, goalkeeper Kayza Massey looks to make a difference

Canada coach Rhian Wilkinson is proud of the diversity and accomplishments of her Canadian team at the FIFA U-17 Women’s World Cup in Uruguay. The team includes 17-year-old Ghana-born goalkeeper Kayza Massey, adopted as a baby by Ottawa nurse Karen Massey. Kayza, who played for Ghana as a 15-year-old at the 2016 U-17 World Cup, switched international allegiance this year and is now wearing the Maple Leaf.
Continue reading “From Ghana to Canada, goalkeeper Kayza Massey looks to make a difference”

The Tale of Two Sisters: A Journey to West Africa

By Helen Frazier

My sister and I traveled to the continent of Africa and visited the nations of Liberia and Ghana. Since this was my first trip visiting the “motherland”, I had no idea that it would take my sister’s knowledge after visiting twice per year for 15 years to keep me safe. Upon our arrival at what I didn’t recognize as an airport, I was met with bribes by security personnel. If it had not been for my sister’s knowledge on how to navigate traveling to another country, I might have missed the opportunity to realize the full benefit of experiencing a culture so different from that of my own.

Continue reading “The Tale of Two Sisters: A Journey to West Africa”

Muslim immigrants from Africa keep proving the American dream is still here for all

The streets of Little Senegal in Harlem, New York and the Cedar-Riverside neighborhood in Minneapolis share a common trait: they are both home to thriving African immigrant communities from west and east Africa, many of whom practice Islam. From halal meat stores to restaurants, fabric stores and shops selling religious articles, these buzzing enclaves offer a telling portrait of Islam in America. This review  by  Abdi Latif Dahir of Lekan Oguntoyinbo’s book in QUARTZ AFRICA tells more of the accomplishments of this community in America.
Continue reading “Muslim immigrants from Africa keep proving the American dream is still here for all”